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Is it true that C-style strings operations, on average, execute 5 times slower than library string class operations, as C++ Primer, 4th Edition would have me believe?

Why ask?

Because when I actually performance test, it turns out that C-style strings are about 50% faster for a particular example (one used in the book).


Setup

I am reading C++ Primer, 4th Edition, which (on page 138) lists this code:

//  C-style character string implementation
const char *pc = "a very long literal string";
const size_t  len = strlen(pc +1);    //  space to allocate

//  performance test on string allocation and copy
for (size_t ix = 0; ix != 1000000; ++ix) {
    char *pc2 = new char[len + 1];  //  allocate the space
    strcpy(pc2, pc);                //  do the copy
    if (strcmp(pc2, pc))            //  use the new string
        ;    //  do nothing
    delete [] pc2;                  //  free the memory
}

//  string implementation
string str("a very long literal string");

//  performance test on string allocation and copy
for(int ix = 0; ix != 1000000; ++ix) {
    string str2 = str;  //  do the copy, automatically allocated
    if (str != str2)    //  use the new string
        ;   //  do nothing
}    //  str2 is automatically freed

Now bear in mind that I'm aware of that strlen(pc +1) on line 2, and that the first for uses size_t but doesn't subscript the array so it might as well have been int, but this is exactly how it is written down in the book.

When I test this code (with strlen(pc) + 1, which I presume was intended), my results are that the first block executes about 50% faster than the second block, which leads to conclusion that C-style strings are faster than library string class for this particular example.

However, I bet I'm missing something (probably obvious), because of what is written in the book (page 139) relating to the code above:

As it happens, on average, the string class implementation executes considerably faster than the C-style string functions. The relative average execution times on our more than five-year-old PC are as follows:

 user    0.47  # string class 
 user    2.55  # C-style character string

So which one is it? Should I have used a longer string literal? Maybe it was because they used the GNU C Compiler and I used the Microsoft one? Is it because I have a faster computer?

Or is the book just wrong on this one?

Edit

Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler version 16.00.40219.01 for 80x86

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried different optimization levels with your c++ compiler? –  iccthedral Jun 22 '12 at 23:09
    
I'm not even aware they exist, could you test the code above using those methods and see if the results match the authors? –  Niko Drašković Jun 22 '12 at 23:11
    
And could you tell us about your c++ compiler? Is it vc++, if so which one? To my knowledge they should be just about equal. –  iccthedral Jun 22 '12 at 23:14
    
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler version 16.00.40219.01 for 80x86, is what it says, and I invoke it like so: cl -EHsc a.cpp –  Niko Drašković Jun 22 '12 at 23:27
2  
Add /O2 to the command line. For programs composed of several files you should really add also /GL. –  Matteo Italia Jun 22 '12 at 23:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your conclusion that C style strings are faster with this example with your compiler & machine, is almost certainly because – one must presume – you

  • forgot to turn on optimization,
  • forgot to make the string length "unknown" to the compiler (this is tricky) so as to prevent it from optmizing away strlen calls, and
  • forgot and turn off safety range checking (if applicable) which would slow down std::string.

Here's the code I tested with:

#include <assert.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>
#include <string>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

extern void doNothing( char const* );

class StopWatch
{
private:
    clock_t     start_;
    clock_t     end_;
    bool        isRunning_;
public:
    void start()
    {
        assert( !isRunning_ );
        start_ = clock();
        end_ = 0;
        isRunning_ = true;
    }

    void stop()
    {
        if( isRunning_ )
        {
            end_ = clock();
            isRunning_ = false;
        }
    }

    double seconds() const
    {
        return double( end_ - start_ )/CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    }

    StopWatch(): start_(), end_(), isRunning_() {}
};

inline void testCStr( int const argc, char const* const argv0 )
{
    //  C-style character string implementation
    //const char *pc = "a very long literal string";
    const char *pc = (argc == 10000? argv0 : "a very long literal string");
    //const size_t  len = strlen(pc +1);    //  space to allocate
    const size_t  len = strlen(pc)+1;    //  space to allocate

    //  performance test on string allocation and copy
    for (size_t ix = 0; ix != 1000000; ++ix) {
        char *pc2 = new char[len + 1];  //  allocate the space
        strcpy(pc2, pc);                //  do the copy
        if (strcmp(pc2, pc))            //  use the new string
            //;   //  do nothing
            doNothing( pc2 );
        delete [] pc2;                  //  free the memory
    }
}

inline void testCppStr( int const argc, char const* const argv0 )
{
    //  string implementation
    //string str("a very long literal string");
    string str( argc == 10000? argv0 : "a very long literal string" );

    //  performance test on string allocation and copy
    for(int ix = 0; ix != 1000000; ++ix) {
        string str2 = str;  //  do the copy, automatically allocated
        if (str != str2)    //  use the new string
            //;   //  do nothing
            doNothing( &str2[0] );
    }    //  str2 is automatically freed
}

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    StopWatch   timer;

    timer.start();  testCStr( argc, argv[0] );  timer.stop();
    cout << "C strings: " << timer.seconds() << " seconds." << endl;

    timer.start();  testCppStr( argc, argv[0] );  timer.stop();
    cout << "C++ strings: " << timer.seconds() << " seconds." << endl;
}

Typical result:

[d:\dev\test]
> g++ foo.cpp doNothing.cpp -O2

[d:\dev\test]
> a
C strings: 0.417 seconds.
C++ strings: 0.084 seconds.

[d:\dev\test]
> a
C strings: 0.398 seconds.
C++ strings: 0.082 seconds.

[d:\dev\test]
> a
C strings: 0.4 seconds.
C++ strings: 0.083 seconds.

[d:\dev\test]
> _

The said, C++ strings are not generally the fastest possible implementation of strings.

Generally, immutable strings (reference counted) beat C++ strings by a good margin, and, surprising to me when I learned that, a string implementation that simply copies the string data is faster still, when it uses an appropriate, fast custom allocator. However, don't ask me how to implement the latter. I only saw the code and test results in another forum, which someone graciously provided after I'd pointed out the general superiority of immutable strings in a discussion with STL and there was some disagreement. ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Same result with your code: C-string 5% faster than C++ string, with argument /O2 passed to compiler. What compiler and optimization did you use? –  Niko Drašković Jun 23 '12 at 9:51
    
@NikoDrašković: can you please post the full actual compiler invocation you used, as well as the compiler version? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 23 '12 at 10:09
1  
@NikoDrašković: the third point in the answer is to turn off range checking. apparently you're linking with the debug version of the runtime library. in visual studio that means you're building a "Debug" version; build a "Release" version instead –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 23 '12 at 12:38
1  
You might (or might not) see a greater difference with the doNothing function in its own file. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 23 '12 at 15:35
1  
hm, you might want to discuss this further in the C++ lounge. apparently you're doing something not quite correct. but the commentary here is not well suited to clear that up. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 23 '12 at 15:53

First of all: there is no definitive answer to this question.

The reason is that the performance depends on the library implementation, the compiler and the options you use, the operating system you use and the CPU architecture you use.

The book is somewhat old(2005, hardware & software have evolved), and the code it has has been tested on old compilers, on old implementations and on old hardware. Whatever it says about the performance is based on the observations by it's authors which definitely would vary between different people trying out the code with different compiler, library and hardware combinations.

The best you can do, is to try yourself. Simple "benchmarks" like these won't tell much about performance between C-style strings vs. std::strings in real world, common situations unless they provide extensive coverage of as many possible ways to test and compare the performance as possible - something which would be quite a big project itself.

Note that compiler optimizations can deceive you with code like shown in the book. For example because of the empty if-blocks, the whole if-statement and the expression within it(in this case for example call to strcpy) can be removed(*). It can be very hard to do meaningful, real-world applicable benchmarks with code blocks as given in the book.

Also note that whatever the results of these micro-benchmarks turns out to be, only applies to the operations they benchmark - in other words - just because string allocation, copy and comparison seem to be x times faster with either std::string or C-style string, does not mean that the other is x times faster than the other in general!

*: Tested the C-style string code with GCC 4.7.1 with -Ofast and there is no reference to strcmp in the compiled executable, suggesting that the string comparison was eliminated as unnecessary in the code - which it indeed is - because the if-block is empty so there's no reason to even have the whole if there in the first place!

To add my own observations: I broke the two pieces of code to distinct functions and then made 100 repeated calls(with a for-loop) to one of them and then measured the running time with the time unix-utility. Compiled with GCC 4.7.1 and -Ofast.

100 calls to the C-Style string function took about 7.05 seconds(3 runs, variation between 7 and 7.1 seconds) while the 100 calls to the std::string version took only around 1.4 seconds on average over 3 runs! Indeed, this would suggest that std::string far outperforms C-style strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea to check if compiler removes the ifs, however, even with those modification I get the same result, c string 5% faster than c++ string. You don't happen to have a Microsoft compiler to test this with? :) –  Niko Drašković Jun 23 '12 at 9:54
    
Having tested this on a Linux distribution (freshly installed, mind you!), with a GCC (the newest one) g++ -O3 a.cpp, the results are similar to what the authors had said (and what all you have said), so I guess it was really a compiler thing. –  Niko Drašković Jun 23 '12 at 11:00

That's not a fair comparison, std::string may use techniques like copy on write. Given your timing results I would guess str2 isn't creating a copy at all, rather a reference to str, which not only saves on the allocation and copy, but may make the comparison a nop as well. Also using strcpy() is suboptimal since it needs to check for a terminator. For a more honest comparison, I would suggest the following revisions:

#include <stdlib.h>
inline void testCStr(const int argc, const char* argv)
{
    const char* str = (argc == 10000) ? argv : "a very long literal string";
    size_t len = strlen(str);

    int i;
    for ( i = 0; i < 1000000; i++ )
     {
        char* dup = (char*) malloc(len + 1);
        memcpy(dup, str, len + 1);
        dup[0] = str[0]; /* keep things even. */
        if (strcmp(str, dup))
            doNothing(dup);
        free(dup);
     }
}

inline void testCppStr(const int argc, const char* argv)
{
    string str = (argc == 10000) ? argv : "a very long literal string";

    for ( int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++ )
     {
        string dup = str;
        dup[0] = str[0]; // force copy (defeats copy on write).
        if (str != dup)
           doNothing(dup.c_str());
     }
}

C++ interfaces are so streamlined and simple, it's easy to overlook how much is actually going on under the hood. The reality is, if both code sequences are written in an equivalent way with respect to the language, performance should be roughly equivalent as well.

A version of testCStr() that is functionally equivalent to the original testCppStr(), might be written as follows:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

/* utility. */
static int strcmpx(const char* x, size_t xsize, const char* y, size_t ysize)
{
    int cmp = memcmp(x, y, xsize);
    if (cmp != 0)
        return cmp;
    return -(xsize < ysize);
}

/* mystring. */
typedef struct mystring {
    long* refcnt;
    char* cstr;
    size_t size;
} mystring;

/* mystring private. */
static inline int mystring_unique(const mystring* x)
{   return *x->refcnt == 1;
}

static inline void mystring_add_ref(const mystring* x)
{   ++*x->refcnt;
}

static void mystring_del_ref(mystring* x)
{
    int unique = mystring_unique(x);
    --*x->refcnt;

    if (unique)
        free(x->refcnt);
}

static void mystring_make_unique(mystring* x, const char* str, size_t size)
{
    void* base = malloc(size + 1 + sizeof (long));
    x->refcnt = (long*) base;
    *x->refcnt = 1;

    x->cstr = (char*) base + sizeof (long);
    memcpy(x->cstr, str, size + 1);
    x->size = size;
}

/* mystring public. */
void mystring_construct(mystring* x, const char* str)
{   mystring_make_unique(x, str, strlen(str));
}

void mystring_construct_copy(mystring* x, const mystring* src)
{
    mystring_add_ref(src);
    *x = *src;
}

void mystring_destroy(mystring* x)
{   mystring_del_ref(x);
}

int mystring_cmp(const mystring* x, const mystring* y)
{   return strcmpx(x->cstr, x->size, y->cstr, y->size);
}

const char* mystring_cstr(const mystring* x)
{   return x->cstr;
}

const char* mystring_at_const(const mystring* x, long i)
{   return x->cstr + i;
}

char* mystring_at(mystring* x, long i)
{
    if (!mystring_unique(x))
     {
        mystring save = *x;
        mystring_make_unique(x, x->cstr, x->size);
        mystring_del_ref(&save);
     }
    return x->cstr + i;
}

/* test case. */
void testCStr(const int argc, const char* argv)
{
#define ITERATIONS 1000000
    const char* temp = (argc == 10000) ? argv : "a very long literal string";
    mystring str;
    mystring_construct(&str, temp);

    int i;
    for ( i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++ )
     {
        mystring dup;
        mystring_construct_copy(&dup, &str);
#ifdef FORCE_COPY
        *mystring_at(&dup, 0) = *mystring_at_const(&str, 0);
#endif
        if (mystring_cmp(&str, &dup))
            doNothing(mystring_cstr(&dup));
        mystring_destroy(&dup);
     }
    mystring_destroy(&str);
}
share|improve this answer

Having agreed to what @zxcdw said, I'd like to add:

There's no inherent reason that the library std::string should be (significantly) slower than the C-style string.

std::string could actually be doing more work, because it could be checking boundaries on each element access (which you should be able to turn off with a compile-time option), etc. It could actually be doing less work, because it knows the length (hence the end) of the string and doesn't have to search for it when you append something. So you never know (without measuring).

On the other hand, knowing more means a bigger memory footprint (two pointers instead of one), and this could also affect the performance (due to more cache misses) when you deal with lots of different string objects in a short time. But I don't think this is what's happening in your case.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah and I believe std::string does some memory allocation and retention? ...kind of like a vector of chars? Because then appending another string means re-allocating new memory, copying ,deleting, et cetera. I'm not 100% sure; again it's implementation specific I think. –  Alex Belanger Jun 23 '12 at 0:19
    
Well, there is an inherent reason why C style string will be slower for unoptimized version of the OP's code, namely that it has to compute the string length. If the compiler is not prevented from optimizing that, however, a modern compiler will realize that the string length is known at compile time, and moreover, due to the simplicity of the C string operations it may realize that the final effect is zero so that it all can be just removed. This is quite different from more realistic code where the strings are unknown to the compiler, and where the action is actually doing something. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 23 '12 at 14:54
    
@AlexBelanger: > Because then appending another string means re-allocating new memory. Not always correct. Most strings will be optimised to allocate a power of 2 which would be amortised constant time. –  teambob Aug 14 '14 at 2:02

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