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i'm using this authorization function in my socket.io setup:

io.set('authorization', function (data, accept) {
    if (!data.headers.cookie) {
        return accept('Session cookie required.', false);
    }
    data.cookie = require("cookie").parse(data.headers.cookie);
    data.cookie = require("connect").utils.parseSignedCookies(data.cookie,"yeah whatever");
    data.sessionID = data.cookie['connect.sid'];
    sessionStore.get(data.sessionID, function(err, session){
        if (err) {
            return accept('Error in session store.', false);
        } else if (!session) {
            return accept('Session not found.', false);
        }
        // success! we're authenticated with a known session.info.
        return accept(null, true);
    });
});

then i manipulate the session variables like this:

var addAchievementToUser = function(achievement, sessionID) {
    sessionStore.get(sessionID, function(err, session) {
            //stuff happens here such as
            session.info.username = "whatever";
            sessionStore.set(sessionID, session, function () {
            });
        }
    });
};

this works fine and does what i want but sometimes it produces some evil race conditions.

so, how can i rewrite this so that it does not create race conditions? i've looked into the connect middleware to see if it is possible to manipulate only a single key / value pair instead of the whole session object. but it seems that this is not possible since the session needs to be a string:

MemoryStore.prototype.set = function(sid, sess, fn){
    var self = this;
    process.nextTick(function(){
        self.sessions[sid] = JSON.stringify(sess);
        fn && fn();
  });
};

any ideas?

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What sort of race conditions are you seeing? Have you looked into using Redis to manage the session? –  Ryan LaBarre Jun 22 '12 at 23:25
    
sometimes two different functions start editing the session at the same time, after they both save the session only the session changes from the slower function will be saved. ive never used redis, would it solve my problem? –  Ezeke Jun 23 '12 at 0:10
    
Yes I believe that it would, if implemented properly. It has a lot of nice CAS style features designed for efficiently and reliably dealing with situations exactly like that. –  Ryan LaBarre Jun 23 '12 at 0:22
    
ok ive looked into it and seems i cant use the connect redis middleware right? it uses the same methods as the memory session so it would also create the same race conditions.. –  Ezeke Jun 23 '12 at 12:57
    
If you are using the MemoryStore (which doesn't scale), you could remove the process.nextTick(), which may keep the process blocked while you commit things your session to the MemoryStore. And yeah, not sure why the Redis middleware would help you in this case. Redis, sure, has all kinds of features, but connect-redis middleware just sets/gets keys. –  dimadima Mar 14 at 0:34
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ok so I started using redis middleware which didn't really help me with the problem. anyway, i basically only edit the session via socket.io (and once when the client first connects), so i figured it'd be the "best" to create a session array which contains all active sessions like this:

io.set('authorization', function (data, accept) {
    if (!data.headers.cookie) {
        return accept('Session cookie required.', false);
    }
    data.cookie = require("cookie").parse(data.headers.cookie);
    data.cookie = require("connect").utils.parseSignedCookies(data.cookie, "rawr");
    data.sessionID = data.cookie['connect.sid'];
    sessionStore.get(data.sessionID, function(err, session){
        if (err) {
            return accept('Error in session store.', false);
        } else if (!session) {
            return accept('Session not found.', false);
        }
        // success! we're authenticated with a known session.info.
        if (!sessions[data.sessionID]) {
            sessions[data.sessionID] = session;
        }

        return accept(null, true);
    });
});

so i never need to use the get session method to edit my session data (only the set method). the good thing is that this way it even works when the same client connects with multiple sockets.

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