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public class Foo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        float f;
        System.out.println(f);
    }
}

The print statement causes the following compile-time error,

The local variable f may not have been initialized

If primitives in Java already have a default value (float = 0.0f), why am I required to define one?


Edit:

So, this works

public class Foo {
    float f;
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new Foo().f);
    }
}

Thanks, everyone!

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4  
re the edit: yes that works, but promoting a local to a field to avoid initialization might not be a reasonable example :-) –  fvu Jun 22 '12 at 23:47
1  
@fvu, it's an example, so it serves some purpose. :D –  user1329572 Jun 22 '12 at 23:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Because it's a local variable. This is why nothing it's assigned to it :

Local variables are slightly different; the compiler never assigns a default value to an uninitialized local variable. If you cannot initialize your local variable where it is declared, make sure to assign it a value before you attempt to use it. Accessing an uninitialized local variable will result in a compile-time error.

Source

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2  
Oh wow, totally learned something new today! :D –  user1329572 Jun 22 '12 at 23:46

In fact, the compiler does not assign a default value to your float f, because in this case it is a local variable -- and not a field:

Local variables are slightly different; the compiler never assigns a default value to an uninitialized local variable. If you cannot initialize your local variable where it is declared, make sure to assign it a value before you attempt to use it. Accessing an uninitialized local variable will result in a compile-time error.

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Class fields (non-final ones anyway) are initialized to default values. Local variables are not.

It's not always necessary to assign a value when a field is declared. Fields that are declared but not initialized will be set to a reasonable default by the compiler.

So a (non-final) field like f in

class C {
  float f;
}

will be initialized to 0f but the local variable f in

void myMethod() {
  float f;
}

will not be.

Local variables are treated differently from fields by the language. Local variables have a well-scoped lifetime, so any use before initialization is probably an error. Fields do not so the default initialization is often convenient.

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1  
+1, Great information about non-final bit! :D –  user1329572 Jun 22 '12 at 23:47

Actually local variables are stored in stack.Hence there is a chance of taking any old value present for the local variable.It is a big challenge for security reason..Hence java says you have to initialise a local varible before use.

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It is correct, if you dont assign any value, the compiler will throw a warning, that it might not be initialized.

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1  
Note that this is a compile error, not a warning, because it is a local variable and not a field. –  sarnold Jun 22 '12 at 23:45

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