Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am getting a segmentation fault while writing to file parent2.txt represented by the variable fp2. I put comments at the line where the program stopped running and at the line responsible for the issue. I am guessing the segmentation fault is a result of "temp4.value" being set to null, even though I thought I gave it a value. There seems to be an issue with the line, "temp2 = *temp2.next". temp2 is a variable of the child struct. I don't know what exactly is wrong with the code, which is what I need help with. Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct Parent
{
    char *value;
    struct Child *next;
    int numChildren;
}Parent;

typedef struct Child
{
    char *value;
    struct Child *next;
    Parent *prev1;
    struct Child *prev2;
}Child;

int isFirst(int parent[], int index)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < index; i++)
    {
        if (parent[i] == parent[index])
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

int addChild(Parent parents[], int index, char *num)
{
    int i;
    Child temp, temp2;
    temp.value = num;
    if (parents[index].numChildren == 0)
    {
        parents[index].next = &temp;
        temp.prev1 = &parents[index];
        temp.prev2 = NULL;
    }
    else
    { 
        for (i = 0; i < parents[index].numChildren; i++)
        {
            if (i == 0)
            {
                temp2 = *parents[index].next;
            }
            else
            {
                temp2 = *temp2.next; // setting temp2 to null?
            }
        }
        temp.prev1 = NULL;
        temp.prev2 = &temp2;
        temp2.next = &temp;
    }
}

int main() { 

    FILE *fp, *fp2;
    char read_file [256];
    char current[256];
    char space = ' ';
    char *curr2, *curr3;
    int i, index;
    int j = 0;
    int parent[] = {1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 4, 4, 1};
    int child[] = {3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 100};
    Parent parents[10];
    Parent temp;
    Child temp2, temp3;
    int numParents = 0;
    int done = 0;

    fp = fopen ("/home/sam/parent.txt","w+");

    if (fp == NULL) {
        printf ("Error opening file: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
    }




    for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
    {
        fprintf(fp, "%d", parent[i]);
        fprintf(fp, " ");
        fprintf(fp, "%d", child[i]);
        fprintf(fp, "\n");
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
    {
        fgets(current, 7, fp);
        printf("%s\n", current);
        curr2 = strtok(current, &space);
        if (isFirst(parent, i) == 1)
        {
            parents[numParents].value = curr2;
            parents[numParents].numChildren = 0;
            numParents++;
        }
        printf("%s\n", curr2);
        curr3 = strtok(NULL, &space);
        while (done == 0)
        {
            temp = parents[j];
            index = j;
            if (temp.value == curr2)
            {
                done = 1;
            }
            j++;
        }
        j = 0;
        printf("\n");
        addChild(parents, numParents-1, curr3);
        parents[index].numChildren++;
        printf("%s\n", curr3);
        done = 0;
    }

    fp2 = fopen ("/home/sam/parent2.txt","w+");

    if (fp2 == NULL) {
        printf ("Error opening file: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
    }

    Child temp4;

    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        fprintf(fp2, "%s", parents[i].value);
        temp4 = *parents[i].next;
        for (j = 0; j < parents[i].numChildren; j++)
        {
            fprintf(fp2, "%s", temp4.value); // segmentation fault occuring on this line second time through inner loop
            fprintf(fp2, " ");
            if (j < parents[i].numChildren-1)
            {
                temp4 = *temp4.next;
            }
        }
        fprintf(fp2, "\n");
    }
    rewind(fp2);
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        fgets(current, 100, fp2);
        printf("%s\n", current);
    }
    fclose(fp);
    fclose(fp2);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
4  
Run it under a debugger! –  Keith Randall Jun 23 '12 at 1:18
    
after using gdb on the linux terminal, i got the message: "Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x00007ffff7aa5b91 in ?? () from /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6". Do you know what this means? –  Sam Johnson Jun 23 '12 at 1:30
    
Most likely it means you didn't compile with -g and you don't know how to use the where command. :) –  David Schwartz Jun 23 '12 at 1:38
    
I did use "-g", but I don't really know how to use gdb, so no, I don't know how to use the where command. –  Sam Johnson Jun 23 '12 at 1:40
    
Ok, I edited my blurb at the beginning, and I just need an explanation as to what's wrong with a certain 2 lines of code –  Sam Johnson Jun 23 '12 at 1:51

1 Answer 1

I think your problems starts already up here, in the addChild function

int addChild(Parent parents[], int index, char *num)
{
    int i;
    Child temp, temp2;
    temp.value = num;
    if (parents[index].numChildren == 0)
    {
        parents[index].next = &temp;     // <---
        temp.prev1 = &parents[index];
        temp.prev2 = NULL;
    }

You assign the address of a local variable to a member of the Parent structure. When the function returns, this will point to an object that has disappeared (a dangling pointer).

Any use of that pointer later will cause all kinds of trouble.

   

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help. Would the solution be to pass a pointer to a parent as a parameter? –  Sam Johnson Jun 23 '12 at 2:28
    
Probably not (I'm not exactly sure what you want to do). The usual way to get objects that outlive the function is to allocate space for them with malloc. –  Bo Persson Jun 23 '12 at 2:33
    
Well the objective is to have a linked list for each number in the parent array. As indexes 0-2 and 7 in the parent array equal one, a parent object would point to child[0], which would point to child[1], to child[2], to child[7]. I am then trying to write this to a file using pointers. But, thank you again, for your help –  Sam Johnson Jun 23 '12 at 2:37
    
@Sam You're dynamically constructing a data structure so malloc is certainly the way to go. –  Jim Balter Jun 23 '12 at 5:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.