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Let's say I have vtk module in my Python site packages, and from application with own Python distribution I want to access this module.

I tried couple of things like:

import sys
sys.path.append("C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages")
sys.path.append("C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages\vtk")
import vtk
lut = vtk.vtkLookupTable()

but it fails to load module properly:

AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'vtkLookupTable'

If I do same from default Python interpreter all is fine.

Now I thought to make a wrapper of vtk in this application site packages, with simple __init__.py resolving paths, so that when I do import vtk it will hopefully load right thing, but I have no experience with Python packages to try to make this work

To put it simple, how can I wrap module from arbitrary folder, in Python site packages by making folder with same name as referenced package and simple __init__.py file?

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2 Answers 2

Remove these lines:

sys.path.append("C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages")
sys.path.append("C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages\vtk")

The site-packages will already be on your python path. Adding a package/folder within that python path (especially at the first level), will just mess with your imports. How is this vtk package structured?

/path/to/site-packages/
                      vtk/
                          __init__.py
                          vtk.py

In this case, to access a function within vtk:

from vtk import vtk
lut = vtk.vtkLookupTable()

It all comes down to how the folder is arranged. You could also do this:

import vtk
lut = vtk.vtk.vtkLookupTable()

Do not try to hack python importing by creating proxy modules simply because you're not understanding how python importing is working. The error was quite clear. The attribute vtkLookupTable did not exist on whatever it was you imported. You imported the wrong thing. Fix it.

You should very very very very rarely have to manipulate the sys.path manually. When you do have to, you should know that it's the right reason - not to work around something you're not fully understanding.

I had trouble with python paths when I first started with python. It can be frustrating, but coming to understand how it works is necessary. What can help you is something like the following:

import vtk
print dir(vtk)

That will print the attributes of vtk, so you can explore exactly what is in the package or module in cases like this where you think you're importing the right thing.

After re-reading your question, it seems like this is a different python install you're talking about. The answer is to install this package into the other python install, or include this package as a top level import by copying the folder into the root level of your application.

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vtk structure is quite complex, with large __init__.py and DLLs from which vtk functions can be accessed. It's just particular problem, I was hoping there is general solution for wrapping package from arbitrary folder with simple __init__.py but perhaps it's not that simple. Thanks for your input, I'll try other things –  theta Jun 23 '12 at 2:43
    
Actually, vtk's __init__.py isn't that large, but it loads some helper modules from it's parent folder and it fails if I don't append also vtk folder to sys path. Anyhow I'm aware my former approach is bad –  theta Jun 23 '12 at 2:52
    
@theta still, I advise using the print dir(vtk) method to see where the importing is going wrong. If you try to proxy the vtk module from within a different __init__.py file, it won't be portable at all, and you won't really be achieving a whole lot (I don't think - I don't have a good idea of where you're at, and I made a lot of assumptions in my initial answer so sorry for that). Just try getting the importing working properly in the traditional way, then you can look into importing from within an __init__ if you really need to –  Josh Smeaton Jun 23 '12 at 3:11

"C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages" is already on your python path. So appending path is unnecessary. Remove:

import sys
sys.path.append("C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages")
sys.path.append("C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages\vtk")

Create a new folder called 'vtk\' in "C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages", then create a new python file named __init__.py in "C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages\vtk" and put your own module vtk.py in this directory. Using:

import vtk

or

from vtk import vtk

to use your own module.

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