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What's the best way to convert an Object array to a Vector?

JDE < 1.5

public Vector getListElements()
{
  Vector myVector = this.elements;
  return myVector;
}

this.elements is an Object[]

Thanks, rAyt

I should clarify my question

My target platform is a blackberry.

Collections aren't supported. Array.asList() isn't, either :/

Full Class

package CustomElements;

import net.rim.device.api.ui.component .*;
import net.rim.device.api.collection.util.*; 
import net.rim.device.api.util.*;
import java.util.*;

public class ContactsList extends SortedReadableList implements KeywordProvider
{
    // Constructor
    public ContactsList(Vector contacts)
    {
    	super(new ContactsListComparatorByFirstName());    
    	loadFrom(contacts.elements());   	
    }
    // Add Element to ContactsSortedReadableList
    void addElement(Object element)
    {
    	doAdd(element); 
    }   

    public Vector getListElements()
    {
    	return new Vector(Collection


    	Vector test = this.getElements();
    }
    // getKeywords
    public String[] getKeywords(Object element) 
    {
    	return StringUtilities.stringToWords(((Contact)element).get_contactFirstName());
        // return StringUtilities.stringToWords(element.toString());
    }  
    //  Comparator sorting Contact objects by name
    final static class ContactsListComparatorByFirstName implements Comparator
    {                           
    	public int compare(Object o1, Object o2)
    	{
    		// Sticky Entries Implementation
    		if(((ContactsListObject)o2).getSticky())
    		{
    			return 1;
    		} else
    			if (((ContactsListObject)o1).getSticky())
    			{
    				return -1;
    			} else
    			{
    				if(((ContactsListObject)o1).get_contactFirstName().compareTo(((ContactsListObject)o2).get_contactFirstName()) <0)
    				{
    					return -1;
    				}
    				if(((ContactsListObject)o1).get_contactFirstName().compareTo(((ContactsListObject)o2).get_contactFirstName()) >0)
    				{
    					return 1;
    				}
    				else
    				{
    					return 0;
    				}
    			}
    	}        
    }    
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted
return new Vector(Arrays.asList(elements));

Now, it may look as if you are copying the data twice, but you aren't. You do get one small temporary object (a List from asList), but this provides a view of the array. Instead of copying it, read and write operations go through to the original array.

It is possible to extends Vector and poke its protected fields. This would give a relatively simple way of having the Vector become a view of the array, as Arrays.asList does. Alternatively, just copying data into the fields. For Java ME, this is about as good as it gets without writing the obvious loop. Untested code:

return new Vector(0) {{
    this.elementData = (Object[])elements.clone();
    this.elementCount = this.elementData.length;
}};

Of course, you are probably better off with a List than a Vector. 1.4 has completed its End of Service Life period. Even 1.5 has completed most of its EOSL period.

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+1 The way to go. –  Tom Jul 12 '09 at 18:53
    
Thanks, Tom –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 12 '09 at 18:55
    
still a great answer, no reason to vote him down! –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 19:04
    
Wow, second solution looks, just so elegant! –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 19:19
    
Very inventive! –  jqno Jul 12 '09 at 20:32
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In J2ME, you're stuck iterating over the array and add the elements one by one.

Vector v = new Vector();
for (int i = 0; i < this.elements.length; i++) {
    v.add(this.elements[i]);
}
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Should I understand why Research in Motion provide something like SortedReadableList which has an LoadFrom Method, but no LoadTO Method?! :) –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 19:02
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A simplified comparator which does basically the same thing.

final static class ContactsListComparatorByFirstName implements Comparator {
    public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {
            // Sticky Entries Implementation
        ContactsListObject clo2 = (ContactsListObject) o2;
        ContactsListObject clo1 = (ContactsListObject) o1;
        if (clo2.getSticky()) return 1;
        if (clo1.getSticky()) return -1;
        return clo1.get_contactFirstName().compareTo(clo2.get_contactFirstName());
    }
}

Using generics and ?: it would be just

static final class ContactsListComparatorByFirstName implements Comparator<ContactsListObject> {
    public int compare(ContactsListObject clo1, ContactsListObject clo2) {
        return clo2.getSticky() ? 1 : // Sticky Entries Implementation
            clo1.getSticky() ? -1 :
            clo1.get_contactFirstName().compareTo(clo2.get_contactFirstName());
    }
}

But to answer your question... (oh I see Tom has what I would put already)

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Generics aren't supported in my java version, either! But thanks for the hint +1 –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 19:16
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imho your only viable option is:

public Vector getListElements()
    Vector vector = new Vector(this.elements.length);

    for (int i = 0; i < this.elements.length; i++) {
        vector.add(this.elements[i]);
    } 

    return vector;
}
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Yeah, seems that way. going to suck copying 1000+ objects in the objects array. –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 19:00
2  
If you're concerned about it, you could toss in an initialCapacity of elements.length to the Vector constructor. –  Carl Manaster Jul 12 '09 at 19:05
    
@Carl: fixed, thanks –  dfa Jul 12 '09 at 20:10
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  1. Copy the array elements to the Vector, or

  2. Use Arrays.asList(...) to return a List, which isn't exactly a Vector, but you should be coding the List interface anyway.

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2  
So, no way around a for loop? –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 18:46
    
I suggest option 2 except it is worth noting that this does not take a copy of the array, it only wraps it. I wouldn't suggest option 1 i.e. don't use a vector unless you really need to. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '09 at 18:47
    
@rAyt: Even if there was a built-in function to do so, it would still use a for-loop behind the scenes. There is no magic :) –  bernie Jul 12 '09 at 18:48
    
System.arraycopy is magic! –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 12 '09 at 18:50
    
no magic... damn you Research in Motion! –  Henrik P. Hessel Jul 12 '09 at 18:55
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