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I'd like to get some community input on best practices for styling your ERB templates.

  • I use a Tab Width of 2.
  • I use soft tabs (spaces).
  • I use a Word Wrap of 80.

I indent all my HTML tags in addition to Ruby code inside my ERB templates.

This usually makes for very readable ERB.

Assuming the above or similar parameters, how do you prefer indent longer lines?

Consider this example:

<div class="content">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="span10">
      <%= simple_form_for(@user, html: { class: 'form-horizontal' }) do |f| %>
        <%= f.input :MembershipID, label: 'Membership ID :', hint: 'Use the user\'s official Membership ID if they have one. Otherwise, enter their phone number (e.g. 2125551234)', input_html: { value: @user[:MembershipID] } %>
      <% end %>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

The f.input line gets to be pretty ugly and unreadable.

I was thinking something like this would be ideal, but I wanted to get some feedback before changing a lot of my style.

<div class="content">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="span10">
      <%= simple_form_for(@user, html: { class: 'form-horizontal' }) do |f| %>
        <%= f.input :MembershipID, 
                label: 'Membership ID :', 
                hint: 'Use the user\'s official Membership ID if they have one. Otherwise, enter their phone number (e.g. 2125551234)', 
                input_html: { value: @user[:MembershipID] } %>
      <% end %>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

I'm back and forth on whether double indenting from the ERB begin tag <%= or from the helper name f.input is better.

Please weigh in! (and please let's not turn this into a ERB vs HAML debate, assume ERB only!)

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
FWIW, I typically follow this guide: github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide, but it doesn't really address ERB. I don't like the idea of indenting everything over to where the parenthesis are (or would be if you used them). –  jkwantum Jun 23 '12 at 5:04
    
Not sure about your word wrapping. I keep code to ~< 60 per line and insert my own returns. I find that if it wraps, it makes for difficult readability of the code. I also find that if its longer than that, I am probably trying to do too much on one line. –  Carson Cole Jun 23 '12 at 17:32
    
That's a good point. I might try inserting my own returns. I'm using Sublime Text 2, and you're right, sometimes the auto word wrap of 80 per line makes for strange indentation. Thanks. –  jkwantum Jun 23 '12 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Some things to consider:

  • Don't use "span10" and "row" classes, but instead apply this in your CSS
  • Use helpers, even if you don't plan on reusing them (at the moment), it cleans up your code

This gives you something like:

<div class="content">
  <%= simple_form_for(@user) do |f| %>
    <%= membership_input_field %>
  <% end %>
</div>

SCSS:

.content {
  @extend .row;
  #users_form {
    @extend .span10;
    @extend .form-horizontal;
  }
}

I can't test this right now, but you should get the general idea. Much cleaner, and much less useless classes to style your HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I think moving this type of code into a helper or presenter is the way to go, as someone else also mentioned that to me via Twitter. –  jkwantum Jun 23 '12 at 20:38
    
Don't forget to mark the answer as helpful / correct, it helps me/others to stay motivated in helping you and others :) –  JeanMertz Jun 24 '12 at 11:39

For long or complex ERB expansions, I often go multiline like so:

<div>
  <div>
    <%=
      some_call_with_lots_of_args_or_a_block(
        arg1,
        arg2
      ) do
        block_stuff()
      end
    %>
  </div>
</div>

Lots of lines, but the indents now all "make sense" for a given value of "sense". HTH!

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