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I was trying to pass the current value of length as the default parameter as a function argument . but compiler is showing error that

" 'this' may not be used in this context"

can any one tell me what is the mistake I have committed. ?

class A
{

    private:
    int length;
    public:
    A();
    void display(int l=this->length)
    {
        cout<<"the length is "<<l<<endl;
    }

};


int main()
{

    A a;
    a.display();    
    return 0;

}
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You could just use length instead of this->length. –  chris Jun 23 '12 at 5:14
1  
@chris: Does it work that way? –  K-ballo Jun 23 '12 at 5:16
1  
@chris , I have already tried that ....that will not work. –  Abhishek Gupta Jun 23 '12 at 5:18
    
@K-ballo, Good point. You have to look beyond what you see. I get it. –  chris Jun 23 '12 at 5:18
    
@chris: Actually, I was just curious if it would work... –  K-ballo Jun 23 '12 at 5:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your member function:

void display(int l=this->length)

is conceptually equivalent to this:

void display(A * this, int l=this->length); //translated by the compiler

which means, you're using one parameter in an expression which is the default argument for other parameter which is not allowed in C++, as §8.3.6/9 (C++03) says,

Default arguments are evaluated each time the function is called. The order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified. Consequently, parameters of a function shall not be used in default argument expressions, even if they are not evaluated.

Note that C++ doesn't allow this:

int f(int a, int b = a); //illegal : §8.3.6/9

The solution is to add one overload which takes no parameter as:

void display()
{
    display(length); //call the other one!
}

If you don't want to add one more function then choose an impossible default value for the parameter. For example, since it describes length which can never be negative, then you may choose -1 as the default value, and you may implement your function as:

void display(int l = -1)
{
      if ( l <= -1 ) 
           l = length; //use it as default value!
      //start using l 
}
share|improve this answer
4  
This answer has it all! I would +10 if I could... –  K-ballo Jun 23 '12 at 5:22
2  
I support this answer for thoroughness. +1 –  Sion Sheevok Jun 23 '12 at 5:23
    
@Nawaz ... So can u please tell me how can pass the member variable....what is the best way in this situation ? –  Abhishek Gupta Jun 23 '12 at 5:23
    
Is there any other to do this apart from adding one more function? –  Abhishek Gupta Jun 23 '12 at 5:27
1  
@Nawaz....thanx ...i got it .....first solution is better.... –  Abhishek Gupta Jun 23 '12 at 5:41

You could user overloading and forwarding instead.

class A
{
    private:
    int length;
    public:
    A();

    void display()
    {
        display(this->length);
    }

    void display(int l)
    {
        cout<<"the length is "<<l<<endl;
    }
};
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At compile time, there is no object, so there is no this.

Why would you pass in one of your object's properties as a default value into a member function if that member function can access the property itself?

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5  
This answer makes no sense to me. –  Benjamin Lindley Jun 23 '12 at 5:22
    
Well, as far as I could understand the original poster's problem he wants to pass a value to an object's member function when that value is actually accessible for that function since it is a member function. That didn't make sense to me. But perhaps I did not understand the question correctly. –  Joost van Stuijvenberg Jun 23 '12 at 5:53

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