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I have been trying to work on creating a tree (like a directory tree) using as much CSS and and as less JS as possible (only for states, etc), and I want to know if there are some good existing tree plugins for bootstrap or jquery-ui bootstrap.


For reference or for people confused about this question, I am looking for something like dynatree for bootstrap.

Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 108 down vote accepted

Building on Vitaliy's CSS and Mehmet's jQuery, I changed the a tags to span tags and incorporated some Glyphicons and badging into my take on a Bootstrap tree widget.

Example: my take on a Bootstrap tree widget

For extra credit, I've created a Github iconGitHub project to host the jQuery and LESS code that goes into adding this tree component to Bootstrap. Please see the project documentation at http://jhfrench.github.io/bootstrap-tree/docs/example.html.

Alternately, here is the LESS source to generate that CSS (the JS can be picked up from the jsFiddle):

@import "../../../external/bootstrap/less/bootstrap.less"; /* substitute your path to the bootstrap.less file */
@import "../../../external/bootstrap/less/responsive.less"; /* optional; substitute your path to the responsive.less file */

/* collapsable tree */
.tree {
    .border-radius(@baseBorderRadius);
    .box-shadow(inset 0 1px 1px rgba(0,0,0,.05));
    background-color: lighten(@grayLighter, 5%);
    border: 1px solid @grayLight;
    margin-bottom: 10px;
    max-height: 300px;
    min-height: 20px;
    overflow-y: auto;
    padding: 19px;
    a {
        display: block;
        overflow: hidden;
        text-overflow: ellipsis;
        width: 90%;
    }
    li {
        list-style-type: none;
        margin: 0px 0;
        padding: 4px 0px 0px 2px;
        position: relative;
        &::before, &::after {
            content: '';
            left: -20px;
            position: absolute;
            right: auto;
        }
        &::before {
            border-left: 1px solid @grayLight;
            bottom: 50px;
            height: 100%;
            top: 0;
            width: 1px;
        }
        &::after {
            border-top: 1px solid @grayLight;
            height: 20px;
            top: 13px;
            width: 23px;
        }
        span {
            -moz-border-radius: 5px;
            -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
            border: 1px solid @grayLight;
            border-radius: 5px;
            display: inline-block;
            line-height: 14px;
            padding: 2px 4px;
            text-decoration: none;
        }
        &.parent_li > span {
            cursor: pointer;
            /*Time for some hover effects*/
            &:hover, &:hover+ul li span {
                background: @grayLighter;
                border: 1px solid @gray;
                color: #000;
            }
        }
        /*Remove connectors after last child*/
        &:last-child::before {
            height: 30px;
        }
    }
    /*Remove connectors before root*/
    > ul > li::before, > ul > li::after {
        border: 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
well done. Except, of course, the odd behaviour of li children of .parent_li who lose their background color and become gray when their parent is hovered over (in your second tree). –  Kumar Harsh May 30 '13 at 15:53
    
Thanks @Harsh. The hover behavior you think odd follows Vitaliy's programming to give the user a visual indicator of which nodes will be collapsed. –  Jeromy French May 30 '13 at 17:55
    
What is the license of this code? I'd like to use it in my project! –  Nathan Moos Jun 2 '13 at 3:22
2  
thanks for the code. how do you collapse default? when you visit the page i want it to be collapsed? could you help me? thanks. –  Erdem Ece Oct 5 '13 at 14:58
1  
jsfiddle.net/jayhilwig/hv8vU :: I updated the code and forked a new fiddle here for bootstrap 3.0: –  jayseattle Apr 8 at 21:06

Can you believe that the treeview on the image below does not use any JavaScript, but relies only on CSS3? Check out this CSS3 TreeView, which is good with Twitter BootStrap:

TreeView

You can get more info about this here http://acidmartin.wordpress.com/2011/09/26/css3-treevew-no-javascript/.

share|improve this answer
    
wow... this is a good one... i'll have to look into this... thanks... –  Kumar Harsh Jun 24 '12 at 8:41
    
@Harsh Sure, its bootstrap ready and please accept my answer if it is helpful. :) PS: We are using it. :) –  Praveen Kumar Jun 24 '12 at 8:52
    
The solution seems good, but there are a few features, which we wanted and are not supplied in this version, such as branch highlighting, etc. But anyways, it is a very good example of how to do the tree styling –  Kumar Harsh Aug 12 '12 at 11:56
1  
found a nice example thecssninja.com/demo/css_tree –  spiderdevil Mar 22 '13 at 19:33
1  
Worth noting that the blog post referred to in the answer contains some simple CSS, which does not work for me, but the actual demo contains some more complicated (and not explained) CSS. –  Robin Green Aug 1 '13 at 11:00

If someone wants vertical version of the treeview from Harsh's answer, you can save some time:

http://jsfiddle.net/Fh47n/

.tree li {
    margin: 0px 0;

    list-style-type: none;
    position: relative;
    padding: 20px 5px 0px 5px;
}

.tree li::before{
    content: '';
    position: absolute; 
    top: 0;
    width: 1px; 
    height: 100%;
    right: auto; 
    left: -20px;
    border-left: 1px solid #ccc;
    bottom: 50px;
}
.tree li::after{
    content: '';
    position: absolute; 
    top: 30px; 
    width: 25px; 
    height: 20px;
    right: auto; 
    left: -20px;
    border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
}
.tree li a{
    display: inline-block;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    padding: 5px 10px;
    text-decoration: none;
    color: #666;
    font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma;
    font-size: 11px;
    border-radius: 5px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
    -moz-border-radius: 5px;
}

/*Remove connectors before root*/
.tree > ul > li::before, .tree > ul > li::after{
    border: 0;
}
/*Remove connectors after last child*/
.tree li:last-child::before{ 
      height: 30px;
}

/*Time for some hover effects*/
/*We will apply the hover effect the the lineage of the element also*/
.tree li a:hover, .tree li a:hover+ul li a {
    background: #c8e4f8; color: #000; border: 1px solid #94a0b4;
}
/*Connector styles on hover*/
.tree li a:hover+ul li::after, 
.tree li a:hover+ul li::before, 
.tree li a:hover+ul::before, 
.tree li a:hover+ul ul::before{
    border-color:  #94a0b4;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Simple and elegant. Upvoted :) –  thefourtheye Jul 1 '13 at 6:27
    
Just perfect solution ! –  CORSAIR Mar 14 at 14:54
    
Wow, great solution - and easily extensible! –  rkallensee Apr 8 at 15:46

For those still searching for a tree with CSS3, this is a fantastic piece of code I found on the net:

http://thecodeplayer.com/walkthrough/css3-family-tree

HTML

<div class="tree">
  <ul>
    <li>
      <a href="#">Parent</a>
      <ul>
        <li>
          <a href="#">Child</a>
          <ul>
            <li>
              <a href="#">Grand Child</a>
            </li>
          </ul>
        </li>
        <li>
          <a href="#">Child</a>
          <ul>
            <li><a href="#">Grand Child</a></li>
            <li>
              <a href="#">Grand Child</a>
              <ul>
                <li>
                  <a href="#">Great Grand Child</a>
                </li>
                <li>
                  <a href="#">Great Grand Child</a>
                </li>
                <li>
                  <a href="#">Great Grand Child</a>
                </li>
              </ul>
            </li>
            <li><a href="#">Grand Child</a></li>
          </ul>
        </li>
      </ul>
    </li>
  </ul>
</div>

CSS

* {margin: 0; padding: 0;}

.tree ul {
  padding-top: 20px; position: relative;

  transition: all 0.5s;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.5s;
  -moz-transition: all 0.5s;
}

.tree li {
  float: left; text-align: center;
  list-style-type: none;
  position: relative;
  padding: 20px 5px 0 5px;

  transition: all 0.5s;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.5s;
  -moz-transition: all 0.5s;
}

/*We will use ::before and ::after to draw the connectors*/

.tree li::before, .tree li::after{
  content: '';
  position: absolute; top: 0; right: 50%;
  border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
  width: 50%; height: 20px;
}
.tree li::after{
  right: auto; left: 50%;
  border-left: 1px solid #ccc;
}

/*We need to remove left-right connectors from elements without 
any siblings*/
.tree li:only-child::after, .tree li:only-child::before {
  display: none;
}

/*Remove space from the top of single children*/
.tree li:only-child{ padding-top: 0;}

/*Remove left connector from first child and 
right connector from last child*/
.tree li:first-child::before, .tree li:last-child::after{
  border: 0 none;
}
/*Adding back the vertical connector to the last nodes*/
.tree li:last-child::before{
  border-right: 1px solid #ccc;
  border-radius: 0 5px 0 0;
  -webkit-border-radius: 0 5px 0 0;
  -moz-border-radius: 0 5px 0 0;
}
.tree li:first-child::after{
  border-radius: 5px 0 0 0;
  -webkit-border-radius: 5px 0 0 0;
  -moz-border-radius: 5px 0 0 0;
}

/*Time to add downward connectors from parents*/
.tree ul ul::before{
  content: '';
  position: absolute; top: 0; left: 50%;
  border-left: 1px solid #ccc;
  width: 0; height: 20px;
}

.tree li a{
  border: 1px solid #ccc;
  padding: 5px 10px;
  text-decoration: none;
  color: #666;
  font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma;
  font-size: 11px;
  display: inline-block;

  border-radius: 5px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
  -moz-border-radius: 5px;

  transition: all 0.5s;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.5s;
  -moz-transition: all 0.5s;
}

/*Time for some hover effects*/
/*We will apply the hover effect the the lineage of the element also*/
.tree li a:hover, .tree li a:hover+ul li a {
  background: #c8e4f8; color: #000; border: 1px solid #94a0b4;
}
/*Connector styles on hover*/
.tree li a:hover+ul li::after, 
.tree li a:hover+ul li::before, 
.tree li a:hover+ul::before, 
.tree li a:hover+ul ul::before{
  border-color:  #94a0b4;
}

PS: apart from the code, I also like the way the site shows it in action... really innovative.

share|improve this answer
5  
This is not really anything like the type of tree you suggested in your question. I believe Praveen Kumar should be awarded with his answer –  Blowsie Jan 17 '13 at 8:58
2  
I was looking for a tree like the first one, saw this answer, and decided to use this instead. Funny how inspiration can change a solution! –  Eric Jan 19 '13 at 0:13
    
@Eric : same here :D –  Kumar Harsh Jan 20 '13 at 18:25
1  
@Blowsie: I have taken your suggestion into consideration and justice has been served, lol. Its good to see a standalone project evolving due to some random request by some random guy. –  Kumar Harsh Aug 12 '13 at 13:03
    
Quick demo: jsfiddle.net/pdcmoreira/6Lghm43a –  Pedro Moreira Aug 9 at 14:11

If someone wants expandable/collapsible version of the treeview from Vitaliy Bychik's answer, you can save some time :)

http://jsfiddle.net/mehmetatas/fXzHS/2/

$(function () {
    $('.tree li').hide();
    $('.tree li:first').show();
    $('.tree li').on('click', function (e) {
        var children = $(this).find('> ul > li');
        if (children.is(":visible")) children.hide('fast');
        else children.show('fast');
        e.stopPropagation();
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
:) nice! Good idea +1. –  Alex Feb 27 at 14:43
    
I added $('.tree > ul > li:first-child').show(); to support multiple trees on the page. Thanks –  tribe84 Mar 22 at 16:36

Another great Treeview jquery plugin is http://www.jstree.com/

For an advance view you should check jquery-treetable
http://ludo.cubicphuse.nl/jquery-plugins/treeTable/doc/

share|improve this answer
    
According to the site, it's not being supported any more since April 2010 –  levelnis Feb 18 '13 at 10:27
    
oh its a shame that it's not being supported... looks good though. –  Kumar Harsh Feb 18 '13 at 12:07
3  
Hi, both libraries are up to date and are supported –  Gal Margalit Feb 18 '13 at 14:05
    
They are supported - see github.com/ludo/jquery-treetable/releases –  Bartek Jablonski Apr 16 at 10:31

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