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I have encountered a problem in one of my Java projects, which causes bugs. The problem sounds as following:

I have two arrays. Let's name them firstArray and secondArray. Object in this case is a seperate class created by me. It works, the array can be filled with objects of that type.

Object[] firstArray= new Object[];
Object[] secondArray = new Object[];

Now, when I get an element out of the first array, edit it and then copy it in the second array, the object from the first array gets altered too.

tempObj = firstArray[3];
tempObj.modifySomething();
secondArray[3] = tempObj;

Whenever I do this, the (in this case) 3rd element(actually 4th) of the first array gets the modifications. I don't want this. I want the first Array to remain intact, unmodified, and the objects I have extracted from the first array and then modified should be stored in the second so that the second array is actually the first array after some code has been run.

P.S. Even if I get the element from the first array with Array.get(Array, index) and then modify it, the element still gets modified in the first array.

Hopefully you understood what I wanted to say, and if so, please lend me a hand :)

Thank you!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're going to have to create a new object.

The problem is the modifySomething call. When you do that, it alters the object on which it's called. So if you've only got one object (even by two names), you can't call modifySomething or they will both change.

When you say secondArray[3] = firstArray[3], you aren't creating a new object: you're just assigning a reference. Going through an intermediate temporary reference doesn't change that.

You'll need code that looks like this:

Object tempObj = firstArray[3].clone();
tempObj.modifySomething();
secondArray[3] = tempObj;

The clone() method must return a new object divorced from the original but having identical properties.

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Thank you! It worked! –  Calin Jun 23 '12 at 7:55

When you retrieve an element from your array, you have a reference to it. So if you modify it, the modification are shered through all the object's references.

In order to leave it intact, you should use some method like Object.clone() or create a new Object and use its constructor to initialize its fields.

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I think it would be worth mentioning that you don't so much have a "reference to the element in the array" - but that you have a copy of the reference which is in the array. It's not like the array stored objects directly. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '12 at 7:24
    
@JonSkeet: Right. Thanks for the clarification Jon :) –  user278064 Jun 23 '12 at 7:26
    
Thanks for the help! –  Calin Jun 23 '12 at 7:56

The object extracted from the first array needs to be cloned to create a new instance that is seperate. Otherwise the modification will affect the object in the first array as it is the same object.

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Sorted that out. Thanks! –  Calin Jun 23 '12 at 7:56

In Java, when you do this secondArray[3] = tempObj;, you actually put the reference to the array, not the real object

So firstArray[3] and secondArray[3] point to the same real object

What you need to do is to create a new object that is identical to your original object, and put the reference of the new object to your secondArray

It might worth to point out that default clone() function only does a shallow copy, so if you have mutable objects in your object's fields, it might cause some problems. Take a look at this article about how to do a deep copy

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Thanks for your help! –  Calin Jun 23 '12 at 7:56

When you retrieve an element from your array, you get a reference to it. So if you modify it, the modification are shared through all the object's references.

In order to leave it intact, you should use some method like Object.clone() or create a new method which take in input your retrieved object and return a new one alike.

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Thank you for your help! –  Calin Jun 23 '12 at 7:56

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