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This question already has an answer here:

I am confused here, even though raw strings convert every \ to \\ but when this \ appears in the end it raises error.

>>> r'so\m\e \te\xt'
'so\\m\\e \\te\\xt'

>>> r'so\m\e \te\xt\'
SyntaxError: EOL while scanning string literal

Update:

This is now covered in Python FAQs as well: Why can’t raw strings (r-strings) end with a backslash?

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marked as duplicate by 200_success, Community Jun 11 at 7:59

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

You still need \ to escape ' or " in raw strings, since otherwise the python interpreter doesn't know where the string stops. In your example, you're escaping the closing '.

Otherwise:

r'it wouldn\'t be possible to store this string'
r'since it'd produce a syntax error without the escape'

Look at the syntax highlighting to see what I mean.

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but the \ inside the string then should also escape the character next to them, instead they simply convert to \\. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 23 '12 at 8:48
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: No, in a raw string, a `` only escapes a quote character. – Eric Jun 23 '12 at 8:50
    
yes, SO is not allowing me to write a single \ in code formatting.;) Thanks I got the point. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 23 '12 at 8:53
    
Sure it does: \ – Eric Jun 23 '12 at 8:54
2  
This answer is incorrect. r'\'' Produces "\\'" in Python 3, so ` doesn't actually escape the '. The documentation is unclear in this case, there is no escaping going on, it's just the string literal parsing that gives an error. – Lennart Regebro Jun 23 '12 at 14:15

Raw strings can't end in single backslashes because of how the parser works (there is no actual escaping going on, though). The workaround is to add the backslash as a non-raw string literal afterwards:

>>> print(r'foo\')
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    print(r'foo\')
                 ^
SyntaxError: EOL while scanning string literal
>>> print(r'foo''\\')
foo\

Not pretty, but it works. You can add plus to make it clearer what is happening, but it's not necessary:

>>> print(r'foo' + '\\')
foo\
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Python strings are processed in two steps:

  1. First the tokenizer looks for the closing quote. It recognizes backslashes when it does this, but doesn't interpret them - it just looks for a sequence of string elements followed by the closing quote mark, where "string elements" are either (a character that's not a backslash, closing quote or a newline - except newlines are allowed in triple-quotes), or (a backslash, followed by any single character).

  2. Then the contents of the string are interpreted (backslash escapes are processed) depending on what kind of string it is. The r flag before a string literal only affects this step.

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It seems the Python scanner stores the 'r' as a token, then goes on to scan the string using the default string processing rules, instead of rules where a baskslash is treated as an ordinary character. This issue is discussed at stackoverflow.com/q/30283082/3259619. – CarpetPython May 17 '15 at 4:36

Quote from https://docs.python.org/3.4/reference/lexical_analysis.html#literals:

Even in a raw literal, quotes can be escaped with a backslash, but the backslash remains in the result; for example, r"\"" is a valid string literal consisting of two characters: a backslash and a double quote; r"\" is not a valid string literal (even a raw string cannot end in an odd number of backslashes). Specifically, a raw literal cannot end in a single backslash (since the backslash would escape the following quote character). Note also that a single backslash followed by a newline is interpreted as those two characters as part of the literal, not as a line continuation.

So in raw string, backslash are not treated specially, except when preceding " or '. Therefore, r'\' or r"\" is not a valid string cause right quote is escaped thus making the string literal invalid. In such case, there's no difference whether r exists, i.e. r'\' is equivalent to '\' and r"\" is equivalent to "\".

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