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I have a simple problem that I've been stuck on for some time and I can't quite find the answer to. Basically, I'm creating an object and trying to access the variables without using static variables as I was told that is the wrong way to do it. Here is some example code of the problem. I receive an error in the first class that can not be resolved to a variable. What I would like to be able to do is access t.name in other methods outside of the main, but also in other classes as well. To get around this previously I would use Test2.name and make the variable static in the Test2 class, and correct me if I'm wrong but I believe that's the wrong way to do it. Any help would be greatly appreciated =)

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test2 t = new Test2("Joe");         
  }

  public void displayName() {
    System.out.println("Name2: " + t.name);
  }
}

public class Test2 {
  String name;

  public Test2 (String nm) {
    name = nm;
  } 
}
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Is adding accessor methods in Test2 an option? Like getName() method that will return name. –  Ankit Jun 29 '12 at 16:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I see others have posted code snippets, but they haven't actually posted why any of this works (at the time of this writing.)

The reason you are getting a compilation error, is that in your method

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Test2 t = new Test2("Joe");         
}

Variable t's scope is just that method. You are defining Test2 t to only be in the main(String[] args) method, so you can only use the variable t in that method. However, if you were to make the variable a field, like so, and create a new instance of the Test class,

public class Test {
Test2 t;
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test test = new Test();
    test.t = new Test2("Joe");  
   test.displayName();
}

public void displayName() {
    System.out.println("Name2: " + t.name);
}
}

Then you should no longer be getting any compilation errors, since you are declaring the variable t to be in the class Test scope.

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Thank you for that explanation. If I wanted to use the variable in a 3rd class, would the code be the same? –  Jarod Jun 23 '12 at 8:53
    
@Jarod it all depends on what the 3rd class is and how you use it. But the basic syntax and idea behind it will still be the same. –  Austin Jun 23 '12 at 8:54
    
Great, I believe that should solve my problem. Thanks again. –  Jarod Jun 23 '12 at 8:59

You may give the reference to your test object as an argument to method displayName:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {    
        Test2 t = new Test2("Joe");         
        displayName(t);
    }

    public static void displayName(Test2 test) {
        System.out.println("Name2: " + test.name);
    }
}

Note: I also made displayName a static method. From within your main method you can only access static methods without reference.

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Modify the Test class to this

public class Test {
  private static Test2 t;

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    t = new Test2("Joe");         
  }

  public void displayName() {
    System.out.println("Name2: " + t.name);
  }
}
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Use a getter for your purpose. This is a side solution to your problem, but generally this is how you should retrieve instance variables, using getters.

public class Test {


public static void main(String[] args) {

    Test2 t = new Test2("Joe");         
    displayName(t);
}

public static void displayName(Test2 test) {
    System.out.println(test.getName());
}
}



public class Test2 
{
private String name;

public Test2 (String nm)
{
    name = nm;
}   

public String getName()
{
     return name;
}
}

Always remember, variables in your class should be private. That protects it from access from outside the class. Hence, getters are the only way to access them. And setters or constructors to initialize them.

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Fewer statics the better I reckon.
I would Instantiate Test and call displayName on the instance of it, then pass the instance of Test2 to displayName. But it does depend on what the overall aim is

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I'm just curious, why would you say the fewer statics the better? –  Austin Jun 23 '12 at 8:52
    
Static methods prevent method overriding, so limit subclassing. Static member variables don't play well with serialization. Statics tend to create confusion and code smells (somewhat hacky code) in my experience. Static declarations I personally try to limit to defining constants. –  davidfrancis Jun 23 '12 at 16:17

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