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I am required to write a program for a Home Automation project, which would run on a Beagle Board running Ubuntu 12.04. Following are the program's functionalities:

  1. Fetch data from a serial port, which in my case is a virtual COM port using FTDI drivers pre-existing in the Linux version. An XBEE module is connected to the USB port which gets receives over Zigbee protocol and sends it serially to the Beagle board.

  2. Dump the above data in a MySQL DB.

  3. Listen to instructions from a Tablet which sends commands over TCP/IP protocol and send the requested information over TCP/IP. Certain cases it could be just be a small data, whereas in certain cases, it might be continuous stream of data.

I have implemented the above functionalities, details are as below:

  1. The code I used for the serial read and write uses the header files provided by the following website http://www.teuniz.net/RS-232/. It uses a while(1) loop to continuously read the serial port to fetch values. I have created a separate thread for this.

  2. I have created a separate thread for the data dumping into the MySQL DB.

  3. Another thread for the TCP/IP server. The thread might spawn more threads when in future the functionality to accept multiple client connections is added.

My questions are:

  1. Is this programming method of spawning multiple threads a good programming method when considering that it is running on an embedded platform with a 1GhZ ARM 7 core?

  2. Is there a better method to do it?

  3. Can you suggest me a method so that I can read and write via serial port concurrently. Do I need to put read and write functionality in separate threads again to do this?

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Is this homework? Do you have any concrete problems? –  Eitan T Jun 23 '12 at 9:01
    
'Linux 12.04' does not exist. Do you mean 'Ubuntu 12.04' instead? –  ArjunShankar Jun 23 '12 at 9:27
    
@ArjunShankar: Sorry, It is Ubuntu 12.04 what I meant. –  ashare Jun 23 '12 at 9:29
    
@ashare - Don't be sorry. You can 'edit' your question and fix it, if you want to. –  ArjunShankar Jun 23 '12 at 9:32
    
@EitanT I am a hardware design engineer by profession. I need to make a protoype for a Home Automation System. Not a good programmer. Needed some suggestions as to what method software professionals would use to solve this. If there is anything in specific you don't understand in my question, please feel free to ask. Thanks. –  ashare Jun 23 '12 at 9:41
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2 Answers

Is this programming method of spawning multiple threads a good programming method when considering that it is running on an embedded platform with a 1GhZ ARM 7 core?

You said that you currently have three threads: a listener thread for the serial port, a database managing thread and a thread for TCP/IP.

The answer here is that it really depends on the performance you want to squeeze out of the hardware. How much of the CPU resources does each of these threads consume?

In my opinion, threads simplify the design and the looks of your software (in most cases). However, they come at a cost:

  • They require context-switching. If it is done too often, it would lead to a significant performance reduction.
  • They make debugging much harder.

If you're not planning on getting close to the performance limits of the platform, my uneducated guess is that you should be fine right now with three threads.


Is there a better method to do it?

This is very much related to your previous question. I'm not familiar with the bottlenecks and constraints of your project. Maybe there are several of them, and maybe there aren't any at all, so it's hard to say if there's a better way to do it. It also depends on what you really want to achieve. Of course, there are alternate methods of doing it.

For instance, instead of multiple threads, you can implement multiple processes. Multiprocessing has its own set of pros and cons:

  • It's heavier on the context. Also, usually IPC is more complicated.
  • It's more stable. An error in one process cannot bring down another process.


Can you suggest me a method so that I can read and write via serial port concurrently. Do I need to put read and write functionality in separate threads again to do this?

It is possible to implement the serial communication thread as one flat while(1) spinning loop that handles both reading and writing (reading a chunk of data, writing a chunk of data, reading a chunk of data, writing a chunk of data, and so on...).

That said, I believe it's a valid (and correct) suggestion to split the serial communication thread into two separate ones (Rx and Tx). I've participated in many projects where it was implemented like that, and it usually proves to be beneficial as the serial protocol gets more complicated.
What I don't understand is whether your serial port is USB or RS-232 though.


Anyway, I hope my answer proves helpful and insightful. Good luck.

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Thank you for the detailed explanation. The links provided by you were very insightful. I had thought of the pros and cons of the various methods before starting it, but me being a beginner in programming, thought of taking the simpler method of using 'threads'. From my understanding(referring to the wiki link), I believe that problem of context switching would arise for process and threads in a similar way. I think I should run the 'top' command and check how much percentage of the CPU each thread utilizes. –  ashare Jun 23 '12 at 13:37
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An alternative to multiple threads is multiple state machines.

The theory behind multiple state machines is that a single thread polls round the multiple state machines, so each call to a state machine must 'run to completion' and return as soon as possible.

State machines are easier to test and debug than multiple threads.

This does mean that it always consumes 100% of the time of one core, unless the polling loop can sleep for a brief period.

You could therefore have a state machine for each of RS232 reading, RS232 writing, DB access and TCP polling.

Also this does not prevent you from having other threads for other parts of your program, or indeed other programs running.

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Thank you for the suggestion. I will try to get more information on the idea of multiple state machines and see whether this would be suitable for my application. Once again, thanks for your time. –  ashare Jun 23 '12 at 13:48
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