Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using flask-sqlalchemy to build a webapp and I have the following model(s):

class Post(db.Model):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String(80), unique=True)
    candidates = db.relationship('Candidate', backref='post', lazy='dynamic')

    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name

    def __repr__(self):
        return "<Post %r>" % self.name

class Candidate(db.Model):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String(80), primary_key=True)
    post_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('post.id'))
    hostel = db.Column(db.String(80))
    yes_no = db.Column(db.Boolean)
    #votes = db.relationship('Vote', backref='vote', lazy="dynamic")

    def __init__(self, name, hostel, post_id, yes_no):
        self.name = name
        self.hostel = hostel
        self.post_id = post_id
        self.yes_no = yes_no

    def __repr__(self):
        return "<Candidate: %r, Post: %r>" % (self.name, self.post.name)

I'm totally noob when it comes to database designing, so I'll really appreciate a few pointers about some fundamental queries I have

  • Is the id column necessary? Most of the tutorials I've seen have that as a column(primary key specifically). Can I do without it? Especially in cases where I have another primary key?

  • How can I have a composite key constraint on Candidate#Name and Candidate#post_id columns, given that post_id is a foreign key.

  • How can I "refresh" my database. After I've made changes in the model, how can I make sure those changes are reflected in the actual tables? Do I need to drop_all and create_all manually?

  • Lastly, does the sqlalchemy documentation apply to flask-sqlalchemy as well?

share|improve this question
1  
You may want to split out these questions; you are making it harder for people to provide you with answers when posting multiple issues in one question. All of the sqlalchemy documentation applies to flask-sqlalchemy as well. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 23 '12 at 11:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Is the id column necessary? Most of the tutorials I've seen have that as a column(primary key specifically). Can I do without it? Especially in cases where I have another primary key?

For the post table, yes. For the other one, no. Some might argue that since name is unique, make it a primary key, but that would mean use the name anywhere you need to reference that post, which means more space (length of the name vs. int) (not necessarily a problem) and think about "what if the candidate name changes?". However, you certainly don't need both.

How can I have a composite key constraint on Candidate#Name and Candidate#post_id columns, given that post_id is a foreign key.

How you are doing it, every post is assigned to one single post:

candidates = db.relationship('Candidate', backref='post', lazy='dynamic')

So, the field should not be called candidates but candidate to make sense.

To answer your question, I will quote from the docs:

To specify multiple columns in the constraint/index or to specify an explicit name, use the UniqueConstraint or Index constructs explicitly.

You would need to add this to your model definition:

__table_args__ = (
        UniqueConstraint("id", "candidate_id"),
    )

Although I think it's useless here (why do you need it? if id is unique(primary key), then any other combination containing it will be unique)...

How can I "refresh" my database. After I've made changes in the model, how can I make sure those changes are reflected in the actual tables? Do I need to drop_all and create_all manually?

You need to commit your changes to the database. From flask-sqlalchemy's documentation:

db.session.add(post)
db.session.commit()

Lastly, does the sqlalchemy documentation apply to flask-sqlalchemy as well?

NOTE This is what I found out on my own, no "official" source, just by reading flask-sqlalchemy's source.

Yes, what differs, is the way you access the model and the session and the engine and ... For example, in sqlalchemy:

from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker
Session = sessionmaker()
session = session()
session.commit()

And in flask-sqlalchemy:

db.session.commit()

And for "Models":

# In sqlalchemy
Base = declarative_base()
class Post(Base):
    # ...

# In flask-sqlalchemy
class Post(db.Model):
    # ...

etc...

Anyway, what you do in the sqlalchemy way, you do it once, and flask-sqlalchemy does it for you in the background.

Hope it helps :) (and that's much more than one question about composite keys in sqlalchemy...)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.