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I have two text file.

file1.txt has:

gedit
google chrome
git
vim
foo
bar

file2.txt has:

firefox
svn
foo
vim

How do I write a script that when executed (with file1.txt and file2.txt as argument) checks for duplication of text in each line (I mean it should process line wise), deletes the duplicated text in both the files.

So after the processing, both file1.txt and file2.txt should have following contents:

gedit
google chrome
git
bar
firefox
svn

Notice that foo and vim has been removed from both files.

Any guidance?

share|improve this question
    
why have 2 files with the same contnents? how big are these files, can they fit into memory when both open at the same time? + what have you tried so far? –  Aprillion Jun 23 '12 at 9:55
    
Try using a set() data structure to find duplicates. docs.python.org/library/sets.html –  user590028 Jun 23 '12 at 9:58
    
@deathApril Assume that I am reinstalling my Ubuntu. So I get a list of packages by dpkg --get-selection command (file1.txt) and there is another list by made by my own (file2.txt), this file contains what I remember what I have installed. After reinstalling Ubuntu I installed software by seeing file2.txt. Now the remaining contents of both the files need to be installed. Now the rest part are in my question.... –  Santosh Kumar Jun 23 '12 at 10:02
    
Always try to think of the right datatype for each individual task. If that succeeds your way is smoothed out. The easiest way is to look out for already existing datatypes which can fit your needs (and the needs of internal functions): least trouble, best effectiveness. –  Paul Engstler Jun 23 '12 at 10:05
2  
does the order of content matter? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 23 '12 at 10:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
with open('file1.txt','r+') as f1 ,open('file2.txt','r+') as f2:
    file1=set(x.strip() for x in f1 if x.strip())
    file2=set(x.strip() for x in f2 if x.strip())
    newfile=file1.symmetric_difference(file2) #symmetric difference removes those values which are present in both sets, and returns a new set.
    f2.truncate(0) #truncate the file to 0 bytes
    f1.truncate(0)
    f2.seek(0) # to push the cursor back to the starting pointing in the file.
    f1.seek(0)
    for x in newfile:
        f1.write(x+'\n')
        f2.write(x+'\n')

now both files contains:

svn
git
firefox
gedit
google chrome
bar
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice touch with the symmetric difference (file1 ^ file2) –  Aprillion Jun 23 '12 at 10:34
    
What does set() do? –  Santosh Kumar Aug 5 '13 at 3:26
    
@SantoshKumar set returns unique items from an iterable/iterator. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 5 '13 at 9:21

You will save the filtered file as a third file?

Anyway, make 2 loops over each file and compare each loop index value with the other one and if they equal, delet and move respectfully. Pseudo code:

Def func(File a, File b):
 for i in a: 
    for j in b:
      if a[i]==b[j]:
        copy and move
      endif
     endfor
  endfor
share|improve this answer
    
No, I want the duplicated to be removed from both the file (modification in both the file). –  Santosh Kumar Jun 23 '12 at 10:00

if I understand your question correctly, it should be easy.

alist = []
for i in ifile1:
    alist.append(i)

for i in ifile2:
    if i in alist:
        alist.remove(i)
    else:
        alist.append(i)

for i in alist:
    print i
share|improve this answer
    
set will be a better way to do it if you have large number of data. –  lucemia Jun 23 '12 at 10:01

if the files are reasonably small to fit into memory, this will do the job:

with open("file1.txt", "r") as f1, open("file2.txt", "r") as f2:
    # create a set from the bigger file 
    result = set(x.strip() for x in f1.readlines())
    # remove duplicates or add unique values from 2nd file
    for line in f2:
        line = line.strip()
        if line in result:
            result.remove(line)
        else:
            result.add(line)
result = "\n".join(result)

# for debug, don't replace original files
with open("file1_out.txt", "w") as f1, open("file2_out.txt", "w") as f2:
    f1.write(result)
    f2.write(result)

# if not inside a function, free memory explicitly  
del result 
share|improve this answer

For Python 2.7+ where Counter was introduced

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> file_1 = ['gedit','google chrome','git','vim','foo','bar']
>>> file_2 = ['firefox','svn','foo','vim']
>>> de_dup = [i for i,c in Counter(file_1+file_2).itertimes() if c == 1]
>>> de_dup
['svn', 'git', 'bar', 'gedit', 'google chrome', 'firefox']
share|improve this answer

Let's start with the input file names:

files = ('raz.txt','dwa.txt')

And some helper functions. This one is a generator that reads all words from the file,

def read(filename):
    with open(filename) as f:
        for line in f:
            if len(line)>0:
                yield line.strip()

And this writes a sequence to the file.

def write(filename, lines):
    with open(filename, 'w') as f:
        f.write('\n'.join(lines))

So let's create two generators - one for each input file

words = [read(filename) for filename in files]

Then, let's transform that list of generators into a list of sets

wordSets = map(set, words)

Now we have a list of 2 sets containing only the unique words from each file.

Let's create another set that contains words present in all input files, by intersecting their sets:

commonWords = set.intersection(*wordSets)

And time for the rewriting.

for filename in files:

Since we want to save to the exact same file, unfortunately we need to first read its whole contents to memory, and then write it from there. (If you wanted the output in different files, you wouldn't have to buffer the file.

Let's create a reader generator and then read all of it to memory by wrapping it with list():

    lines = list(read(filename))

and then write the words back to the given file, in order, but only if they are not in commonWords

    write(filename, (word for word in lines if word not in commonWords))

Input:

raz.txt

gedit
google chrome
git
vim
foo
bar

dwa.txt

firefox
svn
foo
vim

Output:

raz.txt

gedit
google chrome
git
bar

dwa.txt

firefox
svn

The duplicates were removed from both.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry for -1, but i find this post unreadable - # comments might help –  Aprillion Jun 23 '12 at 10:38
    
And here I thought that it's so easy to annotate code on SO –  Kos Jun 23 '12 at 10:44

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