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With all the hype around MVC (and rightly so) I've decided to give it a go myself and write my first .NET MVC web application. With a few options to choose from I was wondering which framework MVC do people recommend.

It seems like the first two are really the top contenders. Also some DI container is a natural complement to MVC - MonoRail would come with one already while ASP.NET MVC could perhaps work with something like Unity.

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Please make this a wiki. –  Daniel A. White Jul 12 '09 at 22:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think the best option would be Microsoft ASP.NET MVC for the following reasons:

  • It's official.
  • It will have integration with visual studio 2010.
  • It was developed by people who work for Microsoft.
  • It's free.
  • It has a large fan base of developers that swear by it.
  • It has lots of documentation and information surrounding it.
  • The power of .NET at your fingertips.
  • Not limited to developing in one language.
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It is not necessarily a positive thing that it has been developed by Microsoft though. The other points I can agree with. –  Halvard Jul 12 '09 at 21:00
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Can you elaborate on how that could be a negative thing? –  JoshJordan Jul 12 '09 at 21:01
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Actually it integrated with VS 2008 too doesn't it? –  mfloryan Jul 12 '09 at 21:10
    
ASP.NET MVC is an addon for VS 2008 and integrates with it very well. As I understand it, MVC will ship "in the box" with VS 2010. –  Wedge Jul 12 '09 at 22:15
    
Yah, it isn't part of the VS 2010 first beta, I heard it's going to be in the second beta. You have to use a special installer right now for the beta also. –  teh_noob Jul 13 '09 at 5:53

ASP.NET MVC comes with all the common DI frameworks available on code-project, and it is pretty easy to do it yourself, too - I rewrote the StructureMap one to support some specific scenarios (picking the SM configuration out of the route data).

So that deals with the main differentiator you mentioned in the question ;-p

I'd use ASP.NET MVC, personally... but it could come close either way. I simply expect ASP.NET MVC to be more mainstream, what with the "official" card leading to more books/community/etc.

Just look at the tags count here on SO; asp.net-mvc (and similar) 4k+; monorail... hard to find...

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Microsoft ASP.NET MVC

pro : you can take advantage of .net and your experience with asp.net

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Your con isn't really true, since ASP.NET MVC can run on Mono. –  Brad Wilson Jul 12 '09 at 20:55
    
yes but i said microsoft asp.net mvc :) –  Hannoun Yassir Jul 12 '09 at 23:30
    
As of Mono 2.4.2.1, Mono comes prepackaged with ASP.Net MVC, Microsoft's ASP.Net MVC. As stated before, your con is false. –  chyne Jul 13 '09 at 17:50
    
ok it is removed :) –  Hannoun Yassir Jul 13 '09 at 20:43

Better you read the article :

http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2007/10/14/asp-net-mvc-framework.aspx

This gives a better understanding on MVC its Pro and cons.

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Sorry, I didn't ask what MVC is about. That I understand pretty well (I hope). The question is really about the details of different MVC frameworks in .NET –  mfloryan Jul 13 '09 at 18:43

It essentially comes down to what you're looking to get out of it

That said it's hard to beat asp.net mvc as it's * actively maintained * consistent/easy to use naming conventions ( if that doesn't make sense, feel free to skip this :) * well documented with source code/tutorials/handon labs et al * scales well out the box with other options available

I had not heard/seen the last 2 choices and while i did browse those links, i'm not going to invest my time learning/reading about them considering asp.net mvc is out there - my 0.02

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