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i'm wondering how can I compare in C language, a number I put on argv[2] and a int number in my code:

EX: prog.exe file.txt 74
========================

int n; 
scanf ("%d", &n);

if (n > argv[2]) 
{ 
   [...] 
}

How can I compare those different kind of data?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Any command line parameters passed to your app are stored in argv as character pointers (aka "C strings"). You need to convert the string to an integer via any of the dozens of methods (simplest is atoi) before comparing.

If you are writing serious production code, avoid using atoi as it is difficult to distinguish between failure and strings evaluating to the number 0. You should instead use strtol with proper error checking.

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1  
sscanf(argv[2], "%d", &m) is also another option. –  Tim Cooper Jun 23 '12 at 13:40
1  
Here's a link to some documentation. Yes, I know it's a c++ reference, but it's the same function. –  jpm Jun 23 '12 at 13:40
    
@jpm thanks. Updated with a link to that. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jun 23 '12 at 13:41
1  
Unfortunately atoi is poorly designed, anyway. strtol is a better choice. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jun 23 '12 at 13:44
1  
@jpm, there's no danger of buffer overflow if you use scanf to read an integer obviously. The problem with scanf is that error checking for inputs like 1234foo is quite cumbersome. –  unkulunkulu Jun 23 '12 at 13:51

Parameters on the command line a character strings. They need to be converted to their respective types. Personally, I would unpack your argv[2] first using an integer variable and atoi; input a user-entered value into n, and then compare, like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int n;
int argv_2;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int rc = 0;

/* Check for three arguments, program name and two passed. */    

    if(3 == argc) 
    {
        argv_2 = strtol(argv[2], NULL, NULL, 10);

        printf("Please enter a number for the vaue of the variable n\t: ");
        scanf("%d", &n);
        printf("\n\n");

        if (n > argv_2)
        {
            printf("The value of n: %i is greater than argv[2]: %i\n", 
                   n, argv_2);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("The value of n: %i is not greater than argv[2]: %i\n", 
                   n, argv_2);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Usage: ./test arg1 arg2 \n\n");
    }

    return rc;
}
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argv_2 = atoi(argv[2], 10); what "10" stays for? Thank You –  l_core Jun 23 '12 at 14:54
    
I should have used strtol. I haven't programmed in C for so long, I did not realize atoi had been deprecated. codecogs.com/reference/computing/c/stdlib.h/atoi.php I edited the answer to reflect. –  octopusgrabbus Jun 23 '12 at 16:17

Simply use atoi() function if you want to convert argv[2] to int with including stdlib.h for the atoi(). This function simply converts the first number digits of a string until it encounters a non-number member of the string.

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