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In my model, I have a base object class A which holds a set of attributes. Each object of A can be connected to any other object of A through a many-to-many association object Context. This Context class holds a key for every connection.

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = "a"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    # other attributes
    value = Column(Integer)

    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

class Context(Base):
    __tablename__ = "context"
    holder_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("a.id"), nullable=False, primary_key=True)
    attachment_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("a.id"), nullable=False, primary_key=True)
    key = Column(String, primary_key=True)

    holder = relationship(A,
        primaryjoin=lambda: Context.holder_id==A.id)

    attachment = relationship(A,
        primaryjoin=lambda: Context.attachment_id==A.id)

The Context class therefore stores 3-tuples of the form ‘Holder object a1 holds attachment a2 with key k1’.

I now want to have a smart proxy collection on A which groups this relationship on the Context.key such that I can use it as follows:

a1 = A(1)
a1.context["key_1"] = set([A(2)])
a1.context["key_2"] = set([A(3), A(4), A(5)])

a1.context["key_1"].add(A(10))

a100 = A(100)
a100.context = {
  "key_1": set([A(101)])
}

How do I have to define context?

I know there is an example for modelling a dict–set proxy in the SQLAlchemy documentation but somehow I am not able to get it to work in a self-referential situation.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

Unless I'm blanking a bit (which is possible...gin...) this can't be done with association proxy directly on the relationship because a1.context would need to be a collection where each element has a unique key, then the collection can be a dictionary - but there is no such collection here, as a1 can have many Context objects with the same key. Assoc prox's simple way of reducing a collection of objects to a collection of an attribute on each member object doesn't apply to this.

So if you really want this, and your structure can't change, just do what association proxy does, just in a hardcoded way, which is, build a proxying collection ! actually two, I think. Not too big a deal, just need to turn the crank....quite a bit, make sure you add tests for every manipulation here:

from sqlalchemy import *
from sqlalchemy.orm import *
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy.ext.associationproxy import association_proxy
import itertools

Base= declarative_base()

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = "a"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    # other attributes
    value = Column(Integer)

    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    @property
    def context(self):
        return HolderBySetDict(self)

    @context.setter
    def context(self, dict_):
        toremove = set([ctx for ctx in self.attached_by if ctx.key not in dict_])
        toadd = set([Context(key=k, holder=item) for k, v in dict_.items()
                            for item in itertools.chain(v)])
        self.attached_by.update(toadd)
        self.attached_by.difference_update(toremove)

class HolderBySetDict(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self.keys())

    def keys(self):
        return list(set(ctx.key for ctx in self.parent.attached_by))

    def __delitem__(self, key):
        toremove = set([ctx for ctx in self.parent.attached_by if ctx.key == key])
        self.parent.attached_by.difference_update(toremove)

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return HolderBySet(self.parent, key)

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        current = set([ctx for ctx in self.parent.attached_by if ctx.key == key])
        toremove = set([ctx for ctx in current if ctx.holder not in value])
        toadd = set([Context(key=key,holder=v) for v in value if v not in current])
        self.parent.attached_by.update(toadd)
        self.parent.attached_by.difference_update(toremove)

    # exercises !  for the reader !
    #def __contains__(self, key):
    #def values(self):
    #def items(self):
    # ....


class HolderBySet(object):
    def __init__(self, parent, key):
        self.key = key
        self.parent = parent

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter([ctx.holder for ctx
                    in self.parent.attached_by if ctx.key == self.key])

    def update(self, items):
        curr = set([ctx.holder for ctx
                            in self.parent.attached_by if ctx.key==self.key])
        toadd = set(items).difference(curr)
        self.parent.attached_by.update(
                [Context(key=self.key, holder=item) for item in toadd])

    def remove(self, item):
        for ctx in self.parent.attached_by:
            if ctx.key == self.key and ctx.holder is item:
                self.parent.attached_by.remove(ctx)
                break
        else:
            raise ValueError("Value not present")

    def add(self, item):
        for ctx in self.parent.attached_by:
            if ctx.key == self.key and ctx.holder is item:
                break
        else:
            self.parent.attached_by.add(Context(key=self.key, holder=item))

    # more exercises !  for the reader !
    #def __contains__(self, key):
    #def union(self):
    #def intersection(self):
    #def difference(self):
    #def difference_update(self):
    # ....

class Context(Base):
    __tablename__ = "context"
    holder_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("a.id"), nullable=False, primary_key=True)
    attachment_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("a.id"), nullable=False, primary_key=True)
    key = Column(String, primary_key=True)

    holder = relationship(A,
        primaryjoin=lambda: Context.holder_id==A.id)

    attachment = relationship(A,
        primaryjoin=lambda: Context.attachment_id==A.id,
        backref=backref("attached_by", collection_class=set))

a1 = A(1)
a2 = A(2)
a3, a4, a5 = A(3), A(4), A(5)
a1.context["key_1"] = set([a2])
a1.context["key_2"] = set([a3, a4, a5])

assert set([ctx.holder for ctx in a1.attached_by if ctx.key == "key_1"]) == set([a2])
assert set([ctx.holder for ctx in a1.attached_by if ctx.key == "key_2"]) == set([a3, a4, a5])

a10 = A(10)
a1.context["key_1"].add(a10)
print set([ctx.holder for ctx in a1.attached_by if ctx.key == "key_1"])
assert set([ctx.holder for ctx in a1.attached_by if ctx.key == "key_1"]) == set([a2, a10])

a100 = A(100)
a101 = A(101)
a100.context = {
  "key_1": set([a101])
}
assert set([ctx.holder for ctx in a100.attached_by]) == set([a101])
share|improve this answer
    
Whoa. Many thanks. Is there any reason for not making the Holder classes collections.MutableMapping / collections.MutableSet? –  Debilski Jul 5 '12 at 13:49
    
no reason, I've found those classes tricky in the past as they seem to assume a lot about what methods you've implemented, so just didn't bother here. –  zzzeek Jul 5 '12 at 14:50
    
I’m awarding you a bounty for this answer (after 23 hours, I guess) – one more question: You don’t make items an attribute in HolderBySet. Is this an oversight or should items always be re-calculated when requested (otherwise one could optimise some methos in HolderBySet, of course). –  Debilski Jul 7 '12 at 16:16
    
assuming you mean HolderBySetDict. There's a lot of methods missing there and are left as reader exercises as the example says.... –  zzzeek Jul 8 '12 at 0:29
    
No, I meant the method HolderBySet.__init__(self, parent, key, items) where items is simply discarded. — the code is running pretty well otherwise, so I hope I have solved all other exercises :) I was just wondering. –  Debilski Jul 8 '12 at 0:33
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