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I'm trying to design an in-memory analogue of database table with indexes. I've implemented a neat DSL to query tables which looks like this

table.select do
  age > 44
  name == "Adam"
end

and produces a bunch of instances of Condition class, like EqCondition, GteCondition etc. Well, that's the easy part. Table examines these conditions and selects an appropriate index to execute the query against. What I'm stuck at is what kind of parameters should Index#select accept? If it accepts the same parameters as the Table's select method it kinda does the same work twice. Let's say we need to select everyone with age greater than 25. First, the Table class determines that there's an index on (age, name) it that could be used. Then, index should determine that this is a range query involving only part of the key and execute it accordingly.

I'm asking about some ideas about how to design this properly (maybe some simpler version of how it's done in real databases)?

PS. It's Ruby but I think it's not relevant. In Java/C# it would look something like table.select(new GtCondition("age", 44), new EqCondition("name", "Adam"))

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1 Answer 1

Take account that the intention of indices on a DBMS is:

  • to reduce IO
  • to optimize joins
  • and as a side effect: to help enforcing some constraints (like PK/FK)

When your are working with all the data in-memory, sometimes just doing a linear scan is enough :)

If you are in doubt, use a profiler... and you'll see that a in-memory collection of let say 1000 elements is tiny. If your code doesn't have any JOIN, using a simple collection.filter(condition) is probably good enough.

But how it works on databases? Here is a rough idea:

  • First the SELECT expression is transformed to a "canonical tree". For example SELECT A.NAME,B.SOMETHING FROM A, B WHERE A.NAME=B.NAME AND B.OTHER > 10 could be represented as:

    PROJECT(A.NAME, B.SOMETHING)
               |
    FILTER(A.NAME=B.NAME, B.OTHER>10)
               |
        CARTESIAN PRODUCT
         |              |
    PROJECT(A.NAME)     PROJECT(B.OTHER,B.SOMETHING) 
    
  • From that expression tree there are some algebraic rules than can be applied. The goal is to avoid a cartesian product, since is very inefficient:

    PROJECT(A.NAME, B.SOMETHING)
               |
        EQ-JOIN A,B USING NAME
         |              |
    PROJECT(A.NAME)     FILTER B.OTHER>10     
                        |
           PROJECT(B.OTHER,B.SOMETHING)
    
  • The DBMS engine analyzes the tree and the metadata of the database (like kind of indices, number of records), and changes the tree to optimize it (that is the query plan). For example if B is sorted by OTHER, is better to do the FILTER first:

    PROJECT(A.NAME, B.SOMETHING)
               |
        EQ-JOIN A,B USING NAME (NESTED LOOP JOIN)
         |              |
     PROJECT(A.NAME)    PROJECT(B.OTHER,B.SOMETHING)
                        |
                      FILTER B.OTHER>10 (UNSING INDEX ON OTHER)
    
  • But then if you do that, and you have buffers of B in memory, maybe you lose the index information and you cannot use the index anymore (and the only option for the join is to use a nested loop). So the engine can detect that, and choose better plan, maybe:

    PROJECT(A.NAME, B.SOMETHING)
               |
         FILTER B.OTHER>10
               |
        EQ-JOIN A,B USING NAME (HASH INDEX EQ-JOIN)
         |              |
     PROJECT(A.NAME)    PROJECT(B.OTHER,B.SOMETHING)
    

Once that the plan is ready. Its like a program: the engine just follows it blindly.

How you can use that, for an in-memory engine? You can detect EQUI JOINS, and transform the "plan" to use a hash table. Maybe you can use a balanced tree to implement other kind of indices, but probably it doesn't help too much: an O(n) algorithm in memory is fine, is the O(nxm) order the one that you have to avoid, and that means avoid cartesian product.

An heuristic that you can do is this:

  • Detect all the equal filters (ie. name=="Adam"), and if your table has a hash index for the field... use it first, something like: table.findUsingHash('name', 'Adam').

  • Then just scan and filter the results (ie age > 44): filter(table.findUsingHash('name', 'Adam'), function (e) { return e.age > 44 })

The idea is to do the most selective index first, so the O(n) scan has a small n.

Note: I don't do this kind of DBMS stuff since a long time. So my tree diagrams can contain some mistakes... consult a DBMS book (like this) for a better source.

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