Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an enum:

public enum Enumeration
{
    A,
    B,
    C
}

And a method that takes one argument of type Enumeration:

public void method(Enumeration e)
{
}

I want that method can accept only A and B (C is considered a wrong value), but I need C in my Enumeration because other methods can accept it as right value. What is the best way to do this?

share|improve this question
2  
You might be interested in something like this: Enum subsets in C# –  paulsm4 Jun 23 '12 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I wouldn't reject just C. I would reject any value other than A and B:

if (e != Enumeration.A && e != Enumeration.B)
{
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("e");
}

This is important, as otherwise people could call:

Method((Enumeration) -1);

and it would pass your validation. You always need to be aware that an enum is really just a set of named integers - but any integer of the right underlying type can be cast to the enum type.

share|improve this answer
    
Why use ArgumentOutOfRangeException instead of ArgumentException? –  gliderkite Jun 23 '12 at 19:10
2  
@gliderkite: Because it fits, I would say. It's "outside the allowable range" just as the exception description states. Note that ArgumentOutOfRangeException extends ArgumentException, so it's still an ArgumentException. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '12 at 19:11

Throw an exception:

public void method(Enumeration e)
{
    if (e != Enumeration.A && e != Enumeration.B) {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("e");
    }
    // ...
}

If you are using .NET 4.0 or higher then you could use code contracts.

share|improve this answer
    
A note: Contract is valid only for .NET Framework 4 or higher. –  gliderkite Jun 23 '12 at 19:04
    
That's a somewhat strange comparison, why not simply use !=? –  Ed S. Jun 23 '12 at 19:29
    
@EdS.: I think it's easier to read "not (a or b)" than "not a and not b", but I can change it if you care about it. –  Mark Byers Jun 23 '12 at 19:42
    
@MarkByers: Haha, no, no need to change your style for me, I was just curious. –  Ed S. Jun 23 '12 at 19:43

As paulsm4 mentioned, you can define:

public enum EnumSubset
{
    A = Enumeration.A,
    B = Enumeration.B,
}

And use:

public void method(EnumSubset e)
{
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.