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i have a collection trends with about 30kk elements. When i am trying execute following code in linqpad

trends.Take(count).Dump();

it works ok.

But if i add sort:

 trends.OrderByDescending(x => x.Item2).Take(count).Dump();

I get System.OutOfMemoryException

What i am doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Are you holding that collection in memory? – phg Jun 23 '12 at 19:12
    
@phg Yes, it's List<Tuple<int,double>> and i hold this collection in memory – Neir0 Jun 23 '12 at 19:13
    
Take will iterate only on the first count items. OrderByDescending will iterate over the whole collection, storing a second, sorted set in memory. – Oded Jun 23 '12 at 19:13
2  
Is "kk" another way to say "million"? OrderByDescending requires O(n) storage. – Hans Passant Jun 23 '12 at 19:14
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/6076316/… (provides solutions) – user166390 Jun 23 '12 at 19:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is another extension method that may work better than the original LINQ (e.g. it shouldn't blow up for a small number of selected items). Like L.B.'s solution it should be O(n) and doesn't keep all items in memory:

public static class Enumerables
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> TopN<T, TV>(this IEnumerable<T> value, Func<T, TV> selector, Int32 count, IComparer<TV> comparer)
    {
        var qCount = 0;
        var queue = new SortedList<TV, List<T>>(count, comparer);
        foreach (var val in value)
        {
            var currTv = selector(val);
            if (qCount >= count && comparer.Compare(currTv, queue.Keys[0]) <= 0) continue;
            if (qCount == count)
            {
                var list = queue.Values[0];
                if (list.Count == 1)
                    queue.RemoveAt(0);
                else
                    list.RemoveAt(0);
                qCount--;
            }
            if (queue.ContainsKey(currTv))
                queue[currTv].Add(val);
            else
                queue.Add(currTv, new List<T> {val});
            qCount++;
        }
        return queue.SelectMany(kvp => kvp.Value);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> TopN<T, TV>(this IEnumerable<T> value, Func<T, TV> selector, Int32 count)
    {
        return value.TopN(selector, count, Comparer<TV>.Default);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> BottomN<T, TV>(this IEnumerable<T> value, Func<T, TV> selector, Int32 count, IComparer<TV> comparer)
    {
        return value.TopN(selector, count, new ReverseComparer<TV>(comparer));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> BottomN<T, TV>(this IEnumerable<T> value, Func<T, TV> selector, Int32 count)
    {
        return value.BottomN(selector, count, Comparer<TV>.Default);
    }
}

// Helper class
public class ReverseComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    private readonly IComparer<T> _comparer;

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return -1*_comparer.Compare(x, y);
    }

    public ReverseComparer()
        : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    { }

    public ReverseComparer(IComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        if (comparer == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");
        _comparer = comparer;
    }
}

And some tests:

[TestFixture]
public class EnumerablesTests
{
    [Test]
    public void TestTopN()
    {
        var input = new[] { 1, 2, 8, 3, 6 };
        var output = input.TopN(n => n, 3).ToList();
        Assert.AreEqual(3, output.Count);
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(8));
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(6));
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(3));
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestBottomN()
    {
        var input = new[] { 1, 2, 8, 3, 6 };
        var output = input.BottomN(n => n, 3).ToList();
        Assert.AreEqual(3, output.Count);
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(1));
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(2));
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(3));
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestTopNDupes()
    {
        var input = new[] { 1, 2, 8, 8, 3, 6 };
        var output = input.TopN(n => n, 3).ToList();
        Assert.AreEqual(3, output.Count);
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(8));
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(6));
        Assert.IsFalse(output.Contains(3));
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestBottomNDupes()
    {
        var input = new[] { 1, 1, 2, 8, 3, 6 };
        var output = input.BottomN(n => n, 3).ToList();
        Assert.AreEqual(3, output.Count);
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(1));
        Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains(2));
        Assert.IsFalse(output.Contains(3));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it works good except case when collection have a few same elements(queue.Add(currTv, val) throw exception) – Neir0 Jun 24 '12 at 13:26
    
@Neir0 I just fixed it to handle duplicates. – Chris Shain Jun 24 '12 at 15:18

OrderByDescending (or OrderBy) materializes the whole sequence when you try to fetch the first element - it has to, as otherwise you can't possibly know the first element. It has to make a copy of the sequence (typically just a bunch of references, of course) in order to sort, so if the original sequence is an in-memory collection, you end up with two copies of it. Presumably you don't have enough memory for that.

share|improve this answer

You don't have to sort the whole collection just take top count elements from it. Here is a solution for this http://codereview.stackexchange.com/a/9777/11651.

The key point from this answer is It doesn't require all items to be kept in memory(for sorting)

Again from comments of the answer in the link:

The idea is: You can find the Max(or Min) item of a List in O(n) time. if you extend this idea to m item(5 in the question), you can get top(or buttom) m items faster then sorting the list(just in one pass on the list + the cost of keeping 5 sorted items)

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