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I am trying to match expressions of the following form with a regex:

PER bla bla bla... PRE bla bla bla... (PUN PRE bla bla bla...)+

bla bla bla... means anything, but in the first case it shouldn't contain any PRE. blab bla bla... in the second case should not contain any PUN PRE.

So the regex should match:

PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla bla bla

as well as:

PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla bla bla

and:

PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla bla bla

It shouldn't match:

PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla bla bla

Because the first string of bla bla bla includes a PRE, which it shouldn't.

PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla

Because the bla bla bla block after the first PRE contains a PRE. The first PRE encountered after the first PRE (so the second PRE encountered) should follow a PUN.

I was trying to use greedy matching and negative lookaheads but to no avail. I am testing on RegExr.

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I think you're going to have to give a few more details - more explanation or examples of matching strings and non-matching strings. Can you show what you've tried? –  Mark Byers Jun 23 '12 at 20:32
    
Give us some valid examples, and some invalid examples –  ohaal Jun 23 '12 at 20:36
    
Does PER.*PRE.*(PUN PRE.* )+ not work? –  xdhmoore Jun 23 '12 at 20:48
    
No. See the question edits. –  simpatico Jun 23 '12 at 21:53
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1 Answer

This regex matches your sample where you want it and ignores the case specified

PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla (?!PRE)

I'm not fully understanding your question though but maybe this shows how to use negative lookahead.

You can give a counter example for the case it doesn't match.

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No. First I rewrote your regex into PER .* PRE .* (?!PRE)(PUN PRE .*)+. Bla bla bla just means .* in regex. The regex matches: "PER bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PRE bla bla bla PUN PRE bla". See question edits. –  simpatico Jun 24 '12 at 10:27
    
Can you take a step back and rephrase the question? I read it 5 times now and still can't figure out what should happen –  buckley Jun 24 '12 at 11:51
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