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I have a Product Service. On each call to Service, I want to call a method. In this case, I am logging. I am looking for a way, not to write the using statement in each method. But I still want the Logging to happen on each call. How do I do this?

    public class ProductService : IProductService
{
    public IList<Product> GetProductsByBrand(int BrandID)
    {
        using (new Logging())
        {
            // Get a list of products By Brand
        }
        return new List<Product>();
    }

    public IList<Product> Search(string ProductName)
    {
        using (new Logging())
        {
            // Search
        }
        return new List<Product>();
    }

    public static string OrderProducts(IList<Order> Orders, Payment paymentDetials)
    {
        string AuthCode;
        using (new Logging())
        {
            // Order and get the AuthCode
        }
        AuthCode = "";
        return AuthCode;
    }
}
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I don't understand. What is the code for the Logging class? Or is that what you are asking? What do you want to log? –  tallseth Jun 23 '12 at 22:43
    
I think what is making your question hard for people to understand is that you aren't storing a reference to the new Logging instance. Therefore it can never be called within the using block. Is this the intent? Do you 1) want to simply call a method before every service method or 2) create an instance that is passed into and consumed by every service method? –  ErnieL Jun 25 '12 at 0:52
    
Sorry for the confusion. I just want to a method before every service method. –  katie77 Jun 26 '12 at 3:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you heard of AOP (Aspect Oriented Programming)? It's a way of implementing cross cutting concerns as reusable Aspects that wrap around the target type and perform additional processing before or after the method that they are wrapping.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorator_pattern

Within a WCF environment this is typically done by applying "Behaviors" to your service class. In this case I would suggest the IOperationBehavior interface using an attribute that implements IParameterInspector in order to look at the parameters before they are passed the service instance is created and called. Here is a link to a useful article that goes into more depth regarding your options for extending the wcf message pipeline.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163302.aspx

//Attribute class
public class LogOperationBehavior : Attribute, IOperationBehavior, IParameterInspector {

public void AddBindingParameters(OperationDescription operationDescription, System.ServiceModel.Channels.BindingParameterCollection bindingParameters) {
    return;
}

public void ApplyClientBehavior(OperationDescription operationDescription, System.ServiceModel.Dispatcher.ClientOperation clientOperation) {
    //clientOperation.ParameterInspectors.Add(new ClientParameterInspector());            
}

public void ApplyDispatchBehavior(OperationDescription operationDescription, System.ServiceModel.Dispatcher.DispatchOperation dispatchOperation) {
    dispatchOperation.ParameterInspectors.Add(this);
}

public void Validate(OperationDescription operationDescription) {
    return;
}



#region IParameterInspector Members

public void AfterCall(string operationName, object[] outputs, object returnValue, object correlationState) {
   //perform logging after
}

public object BeforeCall(string operationName, object[] inputs) {
    //perform logging before
    return null;
}

#endregion

}

  public class BusinessOperation : IBusinessOperation {

    //Apply to your service via an attribute
    [LogOperationBehavior]
    public DivideResponse DivideTwoNumbers(DivideRequest dr) {            
        return new DivideResponse() {
            Answer = dr.Numerator/ dr.Demoninator2,              
        };
    }
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This is very interesting. I have a question here. Not related to the actual question above. But in behaviors, can I access the OperationContext? –  katie77 Jun 27 '12 at 2:40
    
I think you would be able to access it from the IParameterInspector methods since those methods are invoked when the service is being called. I think the OperationBehavior methods are called when constructing the service description and won't have access to the OperationContext. I haven't tried that. –  Jason Turan Jun 27 '12 at 18:07

Have you considered creating a logging proxy? It would look something like this:

public class LoggingProductService : IProductService
{
    private readonly IProductService _core;

    public LoggingProductService(IProductService core)
    {
        _core = core;
    }

    public IList<Product> GetProductsByBrand(int BrandID)
    {
        Log("Getting products for brand " + BrandId);
        return _core.GetProductsByBrand(BrandId);
    }

    //other IProductService methods here, all logging and delegating to _core

    private void Log(string message)
    {
        using (var log = new Logging())
        {
            log.Write(message);
        }
    }
}

Of course, I don't entirely understand your Logging interface, so fill in the appropriate guesses with correct code. You also may not want to create and Dispose a Logging that often, I don't know.

share|improve this answer
    
My question is not regarding the implementation of the Logging interface. In the above example, you would call Log() method for all the methods that are implemented by Product Service. My question is there a way to avoid adding the Log() call to all the methods of product Service. –  katie77 Jun 24 '12 at 2:32

You can create a dynamic proxy. See this article for instructions. http://www.drdobbs.com/windows/184405378

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