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I'm very new to programming in C++ but I'm trying to write some code which filters a specific word from a string and then takes a specific action. For some reason the code does not see the text inside the string.

printf("%s \n", data.c_str());
cout << data;

This shows absolutely nothing - meaning I cannot use .find or write it to a file.

printf("%s \n", data);

This shows exactly what I need.

I am writing the code into data with assembly:

mov data, EDX

Why is that I can only use the the last method?

Edit: Data is initiated as: std::string data;

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what's the type of data? show how you initialize it. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 23 '12 at 22:19
    
try cout << data << endl; –  Lou Jun 23 '12 at 22:21
2  
If printf("%s \n", data); works... something's wrong if data is a string. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 23 '12 at 22:25
    
Maybe I should be using wchar_t instead? Because the input comes via assembly from another program. –  user1477410 Jun 23 '12 at 22:29
    
You still haven't answered any of my questions... what is the type of data and how are you initializing it (just saying mov data, EDX is not nearly enough... I'm very inclined to downvote the question. If you want help, you need to provide more info. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 23 '12 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

The two function calls are not equivalent, as \n at printf flushes the stream. Try with:

cout << data << endl;
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Thank you for your comment. unfortunately it seems like it only clears the console screen. –  user1477410 Jun 23 '12 at 22:27
    
@user1477410: Is what I assume is a std::string data empty by any chance? –  K-ballo Jun 23 '12 at 22:28
    
Im sorry but i dont understand what you are meaning. –  user1477410 Jun 23 '12 at 22:34
    
@user1477410: Is data an std::string? I assume it is but wouldn't know for sure as you haven't showed us its declaration. In case it is a std::string, is it empty? As in data.empty() returns true. –  K-ballo Jun 23 '12 at 22:36
    
Yes, data is a std::string and it is empty. Only the assembly codes adds a value to it. –  user1477410 Jun 23 '12 at 22:43

Be sure you used

#include <string>

in your file header. With this in place you should be able to use

std::cout << data << endl;

with no issues. If you're using a global namespace for std you may not need the std::, but I'd put it anyway to help you debug a it faster and eliminate that as a possible problem.

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