Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a style issue in my code that I wonder if others have encountered. Say I have a class that either doesnt have a default constructor, or has a default constructor that I don't want to call (for performance and style reason). For sake of example, let's say this is a File object.

Now let's say that I have a file that contains a list of filenames to delete... And I want to do the following:

File f("foo");
for (const string& filenameToDelete : f.Lines())
    File(filenameToDelete).Delete();

File can throw FileNotFound in the constructor or in the Delete function. My code must throw on first failure to delete a file, but must not throw if the file "foo" doesnt exist (the absence of the file just means that there is nothing to delete).

I wish I could write something like this:

try { File f("foo"); } catch (FileNotFound) { return; }
for (const string& filenameToDelete : f.Lines())
    File(filenameToDelete).Delete();

but that obviously doesn't compile. I could do this:

unique_ptr<File> f;
try { f.reset(new File("foo")); } catch (FileNotFound) { return; }
for (const string& filenameToDelete : f->Lines())
    File(filenameToDelete).Delete();

but I somewhat dislike the fact that I need to do a memory allocation for a variable that could otherwise be stack allocated...

If I want to write the code with the somewhat arbitrary constraint that I don't do heap allocations, I can only think of doing it this way:

struct FileNotFoundToRethrow : public FileNotFound {};
try
{
    File f("foo");
    try
    {
        for (const string& filenameToDelete : f.Lines())
            File(filenameToDelete).Delete();
    }
    catch (FileNotFound)
    {
        throw FileNotFoundToRethrow();
    }
}
catch (FileNotFoundToRethrow) { throw; }
catch (FileNotFound) { return; }

I find this pretty ugly, it's hard to see that all I want to do is handle the FileNotFound exception thrown on the first line... Any better way?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you insist on writing File(filenameToDelete).Delete() as a single statement? If you split that up into File foo(filenameToDelete) and then foo.Delete(), it seems like you'd be able to do what you want. – jjlin Jun 23 '12 at 23:18
    
I was writing them as a single statement mostly to make the example as short as possible (to save time to the reader). I'm not sure I see how splitting the line in two would help in my case. – anonymous Jun 23 '12 at 23:21
    
Boost.Optional would work just like unique_ptr, except no allocations are needed. – K-ballo Jun 23 '12 at 23:43

I'd do it with a flag

bool throwOnNotFound = false;

try
{
    File f("foo");

    throwOnNotFound = true;

    for (const string& filenameToDelete : f.Lines())
        File(filenameToDelete).Delete();
}
catch (FileNotFound)
{
    if (throwOnNotFound)
        throw;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right that it's cleaner than my definition of a new exception type! I still kind of dislike the fact that the catch block is that far from the line for which we want to handle the exception... – anonymous Jun 23 '12 at 23:24

There is maybe a way for all those who feel particularly smarty, extending the lifetime with reference to const. But there are drawbacks. A class must have a null (or default) object, and, well, the reference is const.

File fooFile()
{
    try { return File("foo"); } catch (FileNotFound) { return File::Default; }
}

using it:

const File& foo = fooFile();

if (foo.IsDefault())
    return;

for (const string& filenameToDelete : f.Lines())
        File(filenameToDelete).Delete();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.