Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to compare 2 images similarity with percentage. I want to detect 90% same images. Each image size is 16x16 pixel. I need some clue, help about it. Right now i am able to detect 100% same images when comparing with the code below

for (; x < irMainX; x++)
{

    for (; y < irMainY; y++)
    {
        Color pixelColor = image.GetPixel(x, y);
        if (pixelColor.A.ToString() != srClickedArray[x % 16, y % 16, 0])
        {
            blSame = false;
            y = 16;
            break;
        }
        if (pixelColor.R.ToString() != srClickedArray[x % 16, y % 16, 1])
        {
            blSame = false;
            y = 16;
            break;
        }
        if (pixelColor.G.ToString() != srClickedArray[x % 16, y % 16, 2])
        {
            blSame = false;
            y = 16;
            break;
        }
        if (pixelColor.B.ToString() != srClickedArray[x % 16, y % 16, 3])
        {
            blSame = false;
            y = 16;
            break;
        }
    }

    y = y - 16;

    if (blSame == false)
        break;
}

For example i would like to recognize these 2 images as same. Currently the software recognizes them as different images since they are not exactly same

enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Define "similarity". –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 23 '12 at 23:29
    
you have point. i will update question one second –  MonsterMMORPG Jun 23 '12 at 23:32
    
question updated with example 2 images –  MonsterMMORPG Jun 23 '12 at 23:36
2  
That's just one example. You need to define what counts as "90% similar". For instance, what about changes in colour? Changes in rotation? Changes in size? Changes in position? etc. etc. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 23 '12 at 23:37
    
Please see "Stack Overflow does not allow tags in titles" –  John Saunders Jun 24 '12 at 1:22
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a count for the number of pixels that don't match:

public const double PERCENT_MATCH = 0.9;

int noMatchCount = 0;
for (int x = 0; x < irMainX; x++)
{
    for (int y = 0; y < irMainY; y++)
    {
       if ( !pixelsMatch( image.GetPixel(x,y), srClickedArray[x%16, y%16] )
       {
           noMatchCount++;
           if ( noMatchCount > ( 16 * 16 * ( 1.0 - PERCENT_MATCH ))
              goto matchFailed;
       }
    }
}
Console.WriteLine("images are >=90% identical");
return;
matchFailed:
Console.WriteLine("image are <90% identical");

You could count matching pixels, but that will be slower. Consider measuring how much two pixels differ. For most purposes - you could have ALL the pixels not match exactly - yet have the images look visually identical

share|improve this answer
2  
goto statements shouldn't be used here. –  Cole Johnson Jun 23 '12 at 23:46
    
thanks this idea seems like pretty much solving my problem. –  MonsterMMORPG Jun 23 '12 at 23:46
    
@Cole: pedantic. Its pseudo code meant to illustrate the principle. –  Rafael Baptista Jun 23 '12 at 23:47
    
-1 Since OP's ask for a c# solution, another -1: assume you shifted the image 1 pixel right and 1 pixel down, Now run your algorithm to compare these two images :) 0% similar? –  L.B Jun 23 '12 at 23:48
1  
Actually there is a whole framework suggested here stackoverflow.com/questions/152028/… but i don't know which dlls should be added as a reference –  MonsterMMORPG Jun 24 '12 at 0:01
show 7 more comments

I wouldn't use image.GetPixel(x,y), as it's a lot slower than utilizing unsafe code to check specific bytes associated with each image.

Check out Lockbits

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.