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Something weird is happening in my Virtual Machine which runs Ubuntu 12.04. The following script, that I successfully used before to run 7 tasks on 7 cores together, doesn't work properly anymore!

Prog out file1.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog1.log &
Prog out file2.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog2.log &
Prog out file3.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog3.log &
Prog out file4.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog4.log &
Prog out file5.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog5.log &
Prog out file6.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog6.log &
Prog out file7.bin fids 72000 > logs/fitlog7.log &

Prog is the executable name.

Previously (2 days ago), when I ran this script, each app executed on a single core and logging was OK. Now, the apps don't start concurrently anymore. 2 or 3 cores start and then stop and only 1 continues running.

Could anyone please explain this behaviour?

System is an Ubuntu 12.04 on VM Workstation on Windows 7. No errors at all are shown in the log files.

Thanks for any efforts.

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Any error messages? Have you tried logging stdout? Prog ... 2>Progerror.log This isn't an issue with your script, it's an issue with the configuration of your virtual machine or the OS. You also don't say which VM you're running, the host OS or other details that might be useful. Most likely, this question is better suited for either the Ubuntu or Unix/Linux Stack Exchange sites. Flag your question and ask a moderator to move it. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 24 '12 at 0:32
    
There are no error messages what so ever. The system is apparently automatically queuing the tasks and running them sequentially rather than in parallel. I already have a log file, and no error at all is shown there. Thanks for the advice about the move, I'll do that if no one did that. Btw, I mentioned at the title it's VM Workstation. Thank you for your answer :) –  The Quantum Physicist Jun 24 '12 at 0:35
    
The logging shown in your script, if that's what you're referring to, only logs stdout. I'm sorry, in my earlier comment I meant "stderr" (and the example snippet is correct for that). –  Dennis Williamson Jun 24 '12 at 0:39
    
Ah sorry, I misunderstood. I'm gonna do that right now, the stderr thing. –  The Quantum Physicist Jun 24 '12 at 0:47
    
I do think it's the system and not the script and not necessarily the program. However, it's sometimes good troubleshooting practice to eliminate the easy stuff. Checking stderr is one such item. Suggesting it was particularly prompted by your statement "Now, the apps don't start concurrently anymore. 2 or 3 cores start and then stop and only 1 continues running." though. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 24 '12 at 0:51

1 Answer 1

Too vague description btw. There should be many possibilities of weird behavior, but in general, when you want to bind processes on Linux to specific CPU cores, start with following:

man cpuset

Otherwise kernel tries to do round-robin distribution of load and processes will 'travel' between cores during its run.

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