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I have the following code:

<html>
<body>
<div style="background-color: lightblue;" onClick="alert(myArray[0][1])">
this is a div
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
var myArray = new Array();
myArray[0][0] = 0;
myArray[0][1] = 00012;
myArray[0][2] = 00006;
myArray[1][0] = 1;
myArray[1][1] = 00004;
myArray[1][2] = 00001;
</script>
</body>
</html>

When I click on the div, nothing happens; there's no alert. When I change the inside of alert to a string, such as 'test', however, then the alert box does come up.

What am I doing wrong? How can I get the value of an item in a multidimensional array?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first line of your code:

var myArray = new Array();

...will create a new, single dimensional array, myArray, that has no elements. Then when you say:

myArray[0][0] = 0;          

...you are trying to access a dimension that doesn't exist yet. That is, myArray[0] is undefined because although myArray is an array it doesn't have any elements yet - so myArray[0][0] is like saying undefined[0].

That's why you have to to assign myArray[0] to refer to a new array before you can access myArray[0][0]. The same thing applies to myArray[1], because JavaScript doesn't have multi-dimensional arrays per se, it has arrays of arrays. So this is what you need (for a minimal change to your existing code):

var myArray = [];
myArray[0] = [];
myArray[0][0] =  00012;
myArray[0][1] = 00012;
myArray[0][2] = 00006;
myArray[1] = [];
myArray[1][0] = 1;
myArray[1][1] = 00004;
myArray[1][2] = 00001;

Note that [] is equivalent to new Array().

An easier to read and type option is to create the sub-arrays via array literal syntax:

var myArray = [];
myArray[0] = [00012, 00012, 00006];
myArray[1] = [1, 00004, 00001];

Or, easiest of all (especially if these are hard-coded values) is creating the whole thing in one statement via a nested array literal (white-space is ignored):

var myArray = [
                [00012, 00012, 00006],
                [1, 00004, 00001]
              ];

(Note also that those leading zeros will disappear for numeric data: use strings ("00012" instead of 00012) if you want to retain the zeros.)

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This is how you declare a multi dimensional array:

MultiArray = new Array(2)

MultiArray [0] = new Array(2)

MultiArray [0][0] = "Tom"

MultiArray [0][1] = "scientist"

MultiArray [1] = new Array(2)

MultiArray [1][0] = "Beryl"

MultiArray [1][1] = "engineer"
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Write it out like this:

<div style="background-color: lightblue;" onClick="alert(myArray[0][1])">
    this is a div
</div>

<script type='text/javascript'>
    var myArray = [];
    myArray.push([0, 00012, 00006]);
    myArray.push([1, 00004, 00001]);
</script>

Edit

The problem is that when you write this:

var myArray = new Array();
myArray[0][0] = 0;

The first item in myArray is undefined, so you can't do anything with it. Using this method, you'd have to create the array first:

var myArray = new Array();
myArray[0] = new Array();
myArray[0][0] = 0;

But I think the method of using the square notation with push is cleaner.

share|improve this answer
    
Is the way I did it incorrect? I did it that way based on what I read on this page: kavoir.com/2009/02/javascript-multi-dimensional-array.html –  Nate Jun 24 '12 at 0:40
    
@Nate the only part you left out is creating the inner array object. Please see my edit. –  McGarnagle Jun 24 '12 at 0:42
    
Thanks for your help. How is the first item in the array undefined? Is that because I assign it a value of zero? I'm used to programming in PHP, and I'm a little confused what I'm doing wrong :) –  Nate Jun 24 '12 at 0:45
    
@Nate not because you assign it zero; it's empty because nothing has been assigned to it yet. Ie, if you write var a = new Array(); alert(a[0]); that gives you undefined. So when you try to write a[0][0], that's like treating undefined as if it were an array. –  McGarnagle Jun 24 '12 at 0:48

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