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I have 30 csv data files from 30 replicate runs of an experiment I ran. I am using pandas' read_csv() function to read the data into a list of DataFrames. I would like to create a single DataFrame out of this list, containing the average of the 30 DataFrames for each column. Is there a built-in way to accomplish this?

To clarify, I'll expand on the example in the answers below. Say I have two DataFrames:

>>> x
          A         B         C
0 -0.264438 -1.026059 -0.619500
1  0.927272  0.302904 -0.032399
2 -0.264273 -0.386314 -0.217601
3 -0.871858 -0.348382  1.100491
>>> y
          A         B         C
0  1.923135  0.135355 -0.285491
1 -0.208940  0.642432 -0.764902
2  1.477419 -1.659804 -0.431375
3 -1.191664  0.152576  0.935773

What is the merging function I should use to make a 3D array of sorts with the DataFrame? e.g.,

>>> automagic_merge(x, y)
                      A                      B                      C
0 [-0.264438,  1.923135] [-1.026059,  0.135355] [-0.619500, -0.285491]
1 [ 0.927272, -0.208940] [ 0.302904,  0.642432] [-0.032399, -0.764902]
2 [-0.264273,  1.477419] [-0.386314, -1.659804] [-0.217601, -0.431375]
3 [-0.871858, -1.191664] [-0.348382,  0.152576] [ 1.100491,  0.935773]

so I can calculate average, s.e.m., etc. on those lists instead of the entire column.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Check it out:

In [14]: glued = pd.concat([x, y], axis=1, keys=['x', 'y'])

In [15]: glued
Out[15]: 
          x                             y                    
          A         B         C         A         B         C
0 -0.264438 -1.026059 -0.619500  1.923135  0.135355 -0.285491
1  0.927272  0.302904 -0.032399 -0.208940  0.642432 -0.764902
2 -0.264273 -0.386314 -0.217601  1.477419 -1.659804 -0.431375
3 -0.871858 -0.348382  1.100491 -1.191664  0.152576  0.935773

In [16]: glued.swaplevel(0, 1, axis=1).sortlevel(axis=1)
Out[16]: 
          A                   B                   C          
          x         y         x         y         x         y
0 -0.264438  1.923135 -1.026059  0.135355 -0.619500 -0.285491
1  0.927272 -0.208940  0.302904  0.642432 -0.032399 -0.764902
2 -0.264273  1.477419 -0.386314 -1.659804 -0.217601 -0.431375
3 -0.871858 -1.191664 -0.348382  0.152576  1.100491  0.935773

In [17]: glued = glued.swaplevel(0, 1, axis=1).sortlevel(axis=1)

In [18]: glued
Out[18]: 
          A                   B                   C          
          x         y         x         y         x         y
0 -0.264438  1.923135 -1.026059  0.135355 -0.619500 -0.285491
1  0.927272 -0.208940  0.302904  0.642432 -0.032399 -0.764902
2 -0.264273  1.477419 -0.386314 -1.659804 -0.217601 -0.431375
3 -0.871858 -1.191664 -0.348382  0.152576  1.100491  0.935773

For the record, swapping the level and reordering was not necessary, just for visual purposes.

Then you can do stuff like:

In [19]: glued.groupby(level=0, axis=1).mean()
Out[19]: 
          A         B         C
0  0.829349 -0.445352 -0.452496
1  0.359166  0.472668 -0.398650
2  0.606573 -1.023059 -0.324488
3 -1.031761 -0.097903  1.018132
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Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Randy Olson Jun 25 '12 at 20:36

Have a look at the pandas.concat() function. When you read in your files, you can use concat to join the resulting DataFrames into one, then just use normal pandas averaging techniques to average them.

To use it, just pass it a list of the DataFrames you want joined together:

>>> x
          A         B         C
0 -0.264438 -1.026059 -0.619500
1  0.927272  0.302904 -0.032399
2 -0.264273 -0.386314 -0.217601
3 -0.871858 -0.348382  1.100491
>>> y
          A         B         C
0  1.923135  0.135355 -0.285491
1 -0.208940  0.642432 -0.764902
2  1.477419 -1.659804 -0.431375
3 -1.191664  0.152576  0.935773
>>> pandas.concat([x, y])
          A         B         C
0 -0.264438 -1.026059 -0.619500
1  0.927272  0.302904 -0.032399
2 -0.264273 -0.386314 -0.217601
3 -0.871858 -0.348382  1.100491
0  1.923135  0.135355 -0.285491
1 -0.208940  0.642432 -0.764902
2  1.477419 -1.659804 -0.431375
3 -1.191664  0.152576  0.935773
share|improve this answer
    
Are you familiar enough with it to give a generic example? The tutorial at pandas.sourceforge.net/merging.html is rather confusing. –  Randy Olson Jun 24 '12 at 1:44
    
I edited my answer to give a simple example. –  BrenBarn Jun 24 '12 at 1:53
    
Right right, that concats the two DataFrames together. But how would I use that concatenated DataFrame to create the average DataFrame? –  Randy Olson Jun 24 '12 at 1:56
    
Perhaps I misunderstood your question. Can you edit your question to be more specific about what you mean by "the average DataFrame"? I thought you meant the average of all values contained in all the DataFrames. –  BrenBarn Jun 24 '12 at 2:41
    
That's correct. I'm trying to create a DataFrame (which I call the "average DataFrame") which contains the averages of all the columns in my list of DataFrames. –  Randy Olson Jun 24 '12 at 3:10

I figured out one way to do it.

pandas DataFrames can be added together with the DataFrame.add() function: http://pandas.sourceforge.net/generated/pandas.DataFrame.add.html

So I can add the DataFrames together then divide by the number of DataFrames, e.g.:

avgDataFrame = DataFrameList[0]

for i in range(1, len(DataFrameList)):
    avgDataFrame = avgDataFrame.add(DataFrameList[i])

avgDataFrame = avgDataFrame / len(DataFrameList)
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