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Why is it possible to initialize a Dictionary<T1,T2> like this:

var dict = new Dictionary<string,int>() { 
    { "key1", 1 },
    { "key2", 2 }
};

...but not to initialize, say, an array of KeyValuePair<T1,T2> objects in exactly the same way:

var kvps = new KeyValuePair<string,int>[] {
    { "key1", 1 },
    { "key2", 2 }
};
// compiler error: "Array initializers can only be used in a variable 
// or field initializer.  Try using a new expression instead."

I realize that I could make the second example work by just writing new KeyValuePair<string,int>() { "key1", 1 }, etc for each item. But I'm wondering if it's possible to use the same type of concise syntax that is possible in the first example.

If it is not possible, then what makes the Dictionary type so special?

share|improve this question
    
I like where this question is going, but it seems unrefined. I like the idea of focusing on List vs. Dictionary (to get the Array out of the way), although the error message might be different? (Musing: How does one know how to create a KVP from {a,b}? ;-) –  user166390 Jun 24 '12 at 1:52
    
(I don't think I got the title quite right, though.) –  user166390 Jun 24 '12 at 1:53
    
@pst yes, I think you're getting closer to the core of what I'm asking. I'm not very good at writing questions ... –  McGarnagle Jun 24 '12 at 1:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 30 down vote accepted

The collection initializer syntax is translated into calls to Add with the appropriate number of parameters:

var dict = new Dictionary<string,int>();
dict.Add("key1", 1);
dict.Add("key2", 2);

This special initializer syntax will also work on other classes that have an Add method and implements IEnumerable. Let's create a completely crazy class just to prove that there's nothing special about Dictionary and that this syntax can work for any suitable class:

// Don't do this in production code!
class CrazyAdd : IEnumerable
{
    public void Add(int x, int y, int z)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x + y + z); // Well it *does* add...
    }

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
}

Now you can write this:

var crazyAdd = new CrazyAdd
{
    {1, 2, 3},
    {4, 5, 6}
};

Outputs:

6
15

See it working online: ideone

As for the other types you asked about:

  • It doesn't work on an array because it has no Add method.
  • List<T> has an Add method but it has only one parameter.
share|improve this answer
1  
Ok ... but List does have an add method, and trying that produces the same error. –  McGarnagle Jun 24 '12 at 1:49
    
See update for explanation. –  Mark Byers Jun 24 '12 at 2:09
1  
been wondering about this forever, thanks –  Sahuagin Jun 24 '12 at 2:24
1  
That's a very evil Add(). I like it. –  lesderid Jun 27 '12 at 6:55

It does work with the Dictionary, because it has an overload for Add that takes two arguments. Arrays dont even have an Add method, let alone one with two arguments.

The Dictionary class is specially designed to work with KeyValuePair<,> internally, that is the only reason you do not need the call the constructor manually, instead the two-argument Add is called and constructs the KeyValuePair under the hood.

Every other IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<,>> does not have this special implementation and therefore has to be initialized this way:

var array = new KeyValuePair<int, int>[] {
    new KeyValuePair<int, int>(1, 2),
    new KeyValuePair<int, int>(3, 4)
};

You can create the same behaviour with your own classes, like lets say you implement this:

class ThreeTupleList<T1, T2, T3> : List<Tuple<T1, T2, T3>>
{
    public void Add(T1 a, T2 b, T3 c)
    {
        this.Add(new Tuple<T1, T2, T3>(a, b, c));
    }

    // You can even implement a two-argument Add and mix initializers
    public void Add(T1 a, T2 b)
    {
        this.Add(new Tuple<T1, T2, T3>(a, b, default(T3)));
    }
}

you can initialize it like this, and even mix three-, two- and one-argument initializers:

var mylist = new ThreeTupleList<int, string, double>()
{
    { 1, "foo", 2.3 },
    { 4, "bar", 5.6 },
    { 7, "no double here" },
    null
};
share|improve this answer

Thanks to multiple answerers for pointing out that the Add method is the magical thing secret sauce that makes the initialization syntax work. So I could achieve my goal by inheriting the class in question (KeyValuePair):

public class InitializableKVPs<T1,T2> : IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T1,T2>>
{
    public void Add(T1 key, T2 value) 
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<string,string>>  GetEnumerator()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    IEnumerator  IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

This now is accepted by the compiler:

var kvps = new InitializableKVPs<string,int> {
    { "key1", 1 },
    { "key2", 2 }
};

Edit: Philip Daubmeier's answer has an actual, concise implementation of this.

share|improve this answer
2  
Exactly. See my updated answer for a very simple implementation of this, if you just inherit from a already implemented ICollection<>, e.g. List<> –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 24 '12 at 2:10
    
Just found out you can even mix initializer elements with different number of arguments :) Updated my answer once more... –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 24 '12 at 2:32

You might not see it but it is the same syntax. The only difference is that an array takes elements as an input where a dictionary takes a 2 dimensional array.

int[] a = new int[]{5,6};
int[,] a = new int[]{{5,6},{3,6}};
Dictionary<int,int> a = new Dictionary<int,int>{{5,6},{3,6}};
share|improve this answer
3  
Thats not exactly the reason why this syntactic sugar is possible. Actually it is due to the implementation of the generic dictionary, that provides a two-argument Add that constructs the KeyValuePair for you under the hood. –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 24 '12 at 1:58

Your problem stems from the fact that it is an array, not a collection.

var kvps = new KeyValuePair<string,int>[] {
    { "key1", 1 },
    { "key2", 2 }
};

should really be:

var kvps = new KeyValuePair<string, int>[] {
    new KeyValuePair<string, int>("key1", 1),
    new KeyValuePair<string, int>("key2", 2)
};

The giveaway is the brackets. [] is an array. {} is a collection.

share|improve this answer
4  
Maybe my question wasn't expressed clearly, but please read it more closely. I mentioned your example in my answer. I know how to write the initialization, but I'm wondering about the underlying reason the simpler syntax is not possible. –  McGarnagle Jun 24 '12 at 1:48

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