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I am designing a DNS parsing library in C++. A DNS Packet has a set of standard fields followed by a list of Resource Records that again has a set of standard fields followed by a RData field. The RData field is parsed based on the type field. Now, I specify a hierarchy for DNSRData, to handle various types. The code looks like something like this:

class DNSRData {
  virtual void ToString() = 0;
  virtual void Parse() = 0;
}

class DNSRData_A : public DNSRData {
  void ToString();
  void Parse();
  uint32_t GetIP();
}

class DNSRData_CNAME : public DNSRData {
  void ToString();
  void Parse();
   const char* GetAlias();
}

class DNSResourceRecord {
  /* Standard Fields 
   ..... */
  int      type_; // Specifies the format for rdata_
  DNSRData *rdata_; 
}

class DNSPacket {
  /* Standard Fields
  ....*/
  vector<DNSResourceRecord *> rr_list_;
}

Now this is the issue I have, each DNSRData record might have different fields. I do not want to add accessors for all the fields in the Base class, as they are present in some derived class and not in others e.g. IP address is present only in DNSRData_A and not in any other.

So, when I want to perform any operations on the DNSRData, I lookup the type and perform a downcast from DNSRData* to DNSRData_A*.

DNSRData *rdata = packet->GetResourceRecord().front(); //not really necessary for this example
if(resource_record.type == RR_CNAME) {
  DNSRData_CNAME *cname = (DNSRData_CNAME*)rdata;
} 

This can cause tons of issues later on, and as we add more types it is quickly becoming an unholy mess. Any ideas on how to solve this problem without adding all accessors to the Base class ?

EDIT:

Some more context, this is part of a high performance DNS trace parse library. A lot of the operations are done as we see packets on the wire. So, what would be an operation that messes up the design, lets say we get a DNSPacket and we parse it now we want to decide how to process it further based on the type.

if(type == RR_CNAME) {
  DNSRData_CNAME *cname = dynamic_cast<DNSRData_CNAME*>(&rdata);
  char *alias = cname->GetAlias();
}else if (type = RR_A) {
  DNSRData_A *a = dynamic_cast<DNSRData_A*>(&rdata);
  uint32_t ip = a->GetIP();
}

As you see there is a downcast involved, from the base type RData to a more specific RData type. I want to avoid this downcast and use maybe a design pattern to solve this problem.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if i understand you correctly i think that the Visitor pattern is what you are looking for

Visitor pattern.

class GetInfoVisitor
  {
    void visit(DNSRData_A* a)
    {
        uint32_t ip = a->GetIP();
    }
    void visit(DNSRData_CNAME * cname) 
    {        
        char *alias = cname->GetAlias();
    }   
  }

class DNSRData
{

    void action(Visitor& visitor) 
    {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

int main()
{
 ...
 GetInfoVisitor getInfoVisitor;
 DNSRData *rdata = packet->GetResourceRecord().front();
 rdata->action(getInfoVisitor);
}
share|improve this answer
    
jojo nailed it, I'm pretty sure that visitor is exactly what you're looking for. Avoid those virtual void ToString() and Parse() member functions entirely, replacing them with ToStringVisitor and ParseVisitor classes. –  mergeconflict Jun 24 '12 at 4:47
    
How will a Visitor work when there are methods present in certain derived classes and not others. example: GetIP is only DNSRData_A and GetAlias is only in DNSRData_CNAME and both derive from the base DNSRData –  creatiwit Jun 24 '12 at 5:20
    
@shrin i added some code i hope it helps –  jojo Jun 24 '12 at 5:45
    
@jojo I am still not clear on how this will work. Say I want to analyze the packet, and I look for CNAME type, I call GetInfoVisitor but how do I access the fields for CNAME. Do I need to create a Visitor class for every operatio I want to perform ? –  creatiwit Jun 24 '12 at 5:52
    
@shrin you will need to add GetInfo method in GetInfoVisitor for each of the different type you choose. same way you would have done with a switch. the difference is that if you wont handle one of the type you will get a compile time error. making this much more maintainable. in addition you can switch visitor to get different behavior –  jojo Jun 24 '12 at 5:58

First off, you might want to consider dynamic_cast, rather than the c style cast you employed in the example. This will allow you to check whether the cast was successful, which can avoid potentially serious errors.

Second, I think more context might be needed to answer your question. Almost invariably, good use of a design pattern can allow you to avoid this situation to start with. Given the information at hand though, I'd suggest perhaps even creating an abstract virtual function called operate in the parent class that can then be overridden to implement the special logic of interest. This would allow you to consider the problem anytime someone overrides the base class, so the code is more maintainable, and would save time because of avoiding looking up the type.

share|improve this answer
    
i do use dynamic_cast, that was a rough example I sketched up. I parsed 10 million records over 5 minutes and over time dynamic_cast slows down the performance. I am adding some more context to the question to explain what the problem is. –  creatiwit Jun 24 '12 at 4:23

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