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While I use iterator like this ,

//include header files
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map<int,int> intIntMap;
    map<int,int>::iterator pos;
    pos = intIntMap.begin();

    intIntMap[0] = 1;
    intIntMap[3] = 5;
    intIntMap[4] = 9;
    intIntMap[5] = 5;

    //遍历
    cout << (*pos).first << endl;

    while( pos != intIntMap.end() )
    {
        cout << pos->first << " <---> " << pos->second << endl;
        pos++;
    }

}

The output is 4;

But while I use iterator like this:

//include header file
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map<int,int> intIntMap;
    map<int,int>::iterator pos;

    intIntMap[0] = 1;
    intIntMap[3] = 5;
    intIntMap[4] = 9;
    intIntMap[5] = 5;

    //遍历
    pos = intIntMap.begin();
    cout << (*pos).first << endl;

    while( pos != intIntMap.end() )
    {
        cout << pos->first << " <---> " << pos->second << endl;
        pos++;
    }

}

The output is what I want;

I want to know what is the difference between use of iterator, what happended to the first iterator when I insert new key-value pair ? Thanks!

addtion: compile is use gcc 4.1.2 , in feel more confused,like this :

compile is use gcc 4.1.2 , in feel more confused,like this :

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Since you called begin() when the container was empty, you got an iterator that was equal to end() (§23.1/7: "If the container is empty, then begin() == end()").

Inserting items into the container didn't change that, so you still have pos == intIntMap.end().

You then execute zero iterations of your loop, since pos==end(), and you'r executing the loop only as long as pos != end().

In the second example, you set pos() after you've inserted the data, so you get the first items in the collection, and iterate to the last.

Edit: As far as printing out the contents of the map goes, I'd probably do it more like this:

std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, std::pair<int, int> const &d) { 
    return os << d.first << " <---> " << d.second;
}

// ...

std::copy(intIntMap.begin(), intIntMap.end(), 
          std::ostream_iterator<std::pair<int, int> >(std::cout, "\n"));
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Going through this with gdb, I found that the first field of the iterator was changing with each addition of a key-value pair. It seems that an iterator to a map with no data in it (returned by begin()) contains some metadata about the map itself, specifically the size of the map (the first field of said iterator grew with each addition of a key-value pair). Calling begin() to retrieve the iterator after a single key-value pair is added results in the "expected" behavior.

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1  
...but it only gives that behavior by accident, because the first element inserted happened to also be the smallest index. Change the insertion order, and your result will change. begin() will give you an iterator to whatever happened to be the first item in the map when you called it. Insert something before that later and your iterator will no longer refer to the first element. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 4:06
    
I compiled it with gcc 4.1.2 , I find that the output of first program is only connected with the key-value pair I insert(nothing with the order of addition),When insert 4 ,the output is 4,when insert 6 pair ,the result is 6; I just want to know why this happened ? –  Sprout_Wang Jun 24 '12 at 4:48

Iterators are intended to be used on a container that has not been modified since the iterator instantiation. The code's output in the first example is undefined, according to the c++ standard (you could still get the result you want, you're just not guaranteed to get it, and there's not much of a reason to expect it).

Nothing happened to the iterator in the first case, but the container you intend it to refer to has undergone changes, and isn't necessarily at the same location in memory.

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4  
§23.1.2/8: "The insert members shall not affect the validity of iterators and references to the container..." (and operator[] is defined in terms of insert). –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 4:01
    
Thanks for correction! –  loki11 Jun 24 '12 at 5:28

Container modification invalidates existing iterators.

The common practice is to get iterator just before using it, and then, throw it away. You could use for like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
  map<int, int> mymap;

  mymap[0] = 100;
  mymap[1] = 200;
  mymap[2] = 300;

  // show content:
  for (map<int, int>::iterator it = mymap.begin(); it != mymap.end(); it++)
    cout << (*it).first << " => " << (*it).second << endl;

  return 0;
}
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3  
§23.1.2/8: "The insert members shall not affect the validity of iterators and references to the container..." (and operator[] is defined in terms of insert). –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 3:59
    
Jerry, I still would not recommend such practice. It is up to compiler to conform to standard. –  lambdas Jun 24 '12 at 4:04
    
I thought it was obvious, but that's a direct quote from the standard. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 4:07

Short answer: there is no guarantee that the iterator is still valid after modifying the container contents.

Since the container here is a map, typically implemented as a red-black tree, the structure is modified and rebalanced during insertions.

In the first example, you are initialising the iterator pos to the start of the map. At this point, the iterator is valid for the current contents. But once you start adding elements, the iterator is no longer pointing to the new begin position of the reorganised container.

So the reason why the second example works is because you are setting the iterator to begin after all modifications to the container have been completed.

In general, it is a bad idea to modify a structure while iterating over it.

This question has some more details on validity of iterators:

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2  
§23.1.2/8: "The insert members shall not affect the validity of iterators and references to the container..." (and operator[] is defined in terms of insert). –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 4:02
1  
Downloading a copy of the C++11 draft specification now... –  gavinb Jun 24 '12 at 4:38
    
@JerryCoffin Trying to brush up on these details, and using the latest draft spec N3337 (and checking an earlier draft) I can't see these details in section 23.1 at all, which is just a short overview. I think you mean 23.2.4/9, which describes Associative Containers? –  gavinb Jun 24 '12 at 4:52
1  
I was quoting from the 03 standard. And yes, you seem to have found the corresponding section in the C++11 standard. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 4:54

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