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This is my code:

public interface InterfaceA<J>{  
    // …
} 

public interface InterfaceB extends InterfaceA<String> {
    // …
} 

public interface InterfaceC extends InterfaceA<Long>{  
    // …
}

public class Creator<J, I extends InterfaceA<J>> {}

public abstract class Base<J, J1> implements InterfaceA<J> {    
    protected Creator<J, J1> creator;    

    protected Base() {
        creator=ObjectCreator.createCreator();
    }   
}

public class Extension1 extends Base<Integer> implements InterfaceB {
    // …
}

public class Extension2 extends Base<Double> implements InterfaceC {
    // …
}

I want Extension1 to have Creator<Integer, InterfaceB> and Extension2 to have Creator<Double, interfaceC>. See the pattern? Creator<T1, T2> where T1 is the type of immediate parent and T2 is the interface implemented by said class. Is there any way to do this? can anybody tell the code of ObjectCreator.createCreator()?

Right now my code looks like this:

public class ObjectCreator {
    public static <J, I extends InterfaceA<J>> Creator<J, I> createCreator() {
        return new Creator();
    }
}

I got errors all over my code. I'm really confused. What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
    
At First is this code syntactically correct? because i think the few keywords are missing to compile the code. –  chaosguru Jun 24 '12 at 6:36
    
Please check your code properly before uploading in SO. The Generics are not properly used. Line protected Creator<J, J1> creator; doesnt make sense and code needs proper syntax. –  chaosguru Jun 24 '12 at 6:49
    
Yes, sorry about that, must have deleted by mistake when editting to change all the "less than" for opening bracket –  Java Developer Jun 24 '12 at 6:59
    
Use Ctrl-K / Cmd-K, or backticks to format names of classes instead of HTML escapes. –  millimoose Jun 24 '12 at 10:55
    
(Also, that's not the correct syntax for HTML escape codes.) –  millimoose Jun 24 '12 at 10:55

1 Answer 1

There's a whole bunch of stuff you missed, a compiling version would look something like this:

package scratch;

interface InterfaceA<J> {
    // …
}

interface InterfaceB extends InterfaceA<String> {
    // …
}

interface InterfaceC extends InterfaceA<Long> {
    // …
}

class Creator<J, I extends InterfaceA<J>> {
}

abstract class Base<J, I extends InterfaceA<J>> {
    protected Creator<J, I> creator;

    protected Base(Class<J> jClass, Class<I> iClass) {
        creator = ObjectCreator.createCreator(jClass, iClass);
    }
}

class Extension1 extends Base<String, InterfaceB> implements InterfaceB {
    protected Extension1() {
        super(String.class, InterfaceB.class);
    }
}

class Extension2 extends Base<Long, InterfaceC> implements InterfaceC {
    protected Extension2() {
        super(Long.class, InterfaceC.class);
    }
}

class ObjectCreator {
    public static <J, I extends InterfaceA<J>> Creator<J, I>
    createCreator(Class<J> jClass, Class<I> iClass) {
        return new Creator();
    }
}

In no particular order of importance:

  • When you have a class with a signature like createCreator() has, you need to pass Class objects as type tokens to it. The Java compiler can't infer the types based on the type of the variable you're assigning the return value to. Besides, you want them there anyway because of type erasure, otherwise you couldn't specialise the Creator based on the given types.
    • If you have Base<J, I> with two type parameters, extending classes should use both of those type parameters.
    • Your extension class signatures were odd. You can't have class Extension1 extends Base<Integer, InterfaceA<String>>, because you can't have a Creator<Integer, InterfaceA<String>>. Using explicit type tokens in createCreator() would have forced you to propagate this constraint everywhere it needs to be and made the error less mysterious. You can't really make Base independent of the constraint between the J and I type parameters.
share|improve this answer
    
actually I wish to avoid the using of .class as the parameter. So you're saying it's impossible to avoid .class to get what I want? Java just don't support this? yeah, type erasure is always a nuisance. will guys in sun create a solution so generics in java can be as powerful as in .net? –  Java Developer Jun 24 '12 at 11:43
    
If you want this to be typesafe you can't avoid passing the type token around, it's as simple as that. In fact one of the main differences between Java and .NET generics is that in .NET, you can use the type parameter as a type token directly. Conversely you can do some of the things Java's generics "don't support" by using type tokens, Class.cast(), and other things at runtime. –  millimoose Jun 24 '12 at 11:45
    
As to the other question: they never will. The design of Java's generics was a conscious decision in favour of backwards compatibility over "power". The approach .NET took has a major disadvantage in that it makes it impossible to "retrofit" old APIs to use generics. This is why they had to create System.Collections.Generic instead of generifying System.Collections. One place where this shows is ASP.NET, where its repeater controls aren't generic and can never be made generic, and the only solution is an .aspx compiler hack, in v4.5, 8 years (!) after C# 2.0 and generics. –  millimoose Jun 24 '12 at 11:52

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