Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have MYSQL data like this

id  | number
1   | 3
4   | 4
7   | 7
10  | 5
11  | 6

I have the database like that, and how to update the number so it will be sorted incremental?
Which mean the result will be like this

id  | number
1   | 1
4   | 2
7   | 3
10  | 4
11  | 5

i updated the question so there will be no confusion in id and since id will be not consecutive

share|improve this question
    
Does the number field also contain unique values, or can there exist the same number twice? –  Zane Bien Jun 24 '12 at 7:37
    
yes the number field can contains exist value (NOT UNIQUE) before sorted. The number field type is VARCHAR without UNIQUE KEY or any KEY –  GusDeCooL Jun 24 '12 at 7:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
set @val = 0;
update  table_name set number = (@val:=@val+1);

This would work even if table is:

id  | number
1   | 3
4   | 4
7   | NULL
10  | 5
11  | NULL

to be like this:

id  | number
1   | 1
4   | 2
7   | 3
10  | 4
11  | 5
share|improve this answer
    
What if there are gaps in number (i.e. number doesn't exist) ? –  Zane Bien Jun 24 '12 at 7:30
    
like this? 1 | 1 4 | 2 7 | 3 10 | NULL 11 | 5 –  osyan Jun 24 '12 at 7:34
    
It will set all of the number column to be 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ... even if some of them are NULL –  osyan Jun 24 '12 at 7:39
    
you also can add order by to be sure ! update table_name set number = (@val:=@val+1) order by id asc; –  osyan Jun 24 '12 at 7:47
1  
@GusDeCooL I hope to correctly understand what you mean! so i should say: It will work but it's not needed to renumber your primary key every day. But the way to run this query faster in the second time that you want to do this, is to renumber the primary key from the maximum of primary key you had last time. I mean you should renumber from id==10,000 to the last column that is created recently in your table. –  osyan Jun 30 '12 at 6:55
update table set number=id where 1
share|improve this answer
    
no no, sorry. the ID might be not be sorted. since some of it will be deleted. –  GusDeCooL Jun 24 '12 at 6:57
    
so please change your table structure in your question to its worst state –  user1432124 Jun 24 '12 at 7:03

Try this:

SET @idrank = 0;
SET @numrank = 0;

UPDATE 
    tbl a
INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT id, @idrank:=@idrank+1 AS id_rank
        FROM tbl
        ORDER BY id
    ) b ON a.id = b.id
INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT number, @numrank:=@numrank+1 AS number_rank
        FROM tbl
        ORDER BY number
    ) c ON b.id_rank = c.number_rank
SET
    a.number = c.number;

This will account for gaps and irregularities in the number field as well as duplicates. Say the entire data set was something like:

id   |   number
---------------
2    |   534
3    |   421
6    |   2038
7    |   41
10   |   5383
11   |   5
12   |   933
15   |   43

The resulting table set after the update will be:

id   |   number
---------------
2    |   5
3    |   41
6    |   43
7    |   421
10   |   534
11   |   933
12   |   2038
15   |   5383

Explanation:

It basically takes the ascending ranks of each field separately and joins on the ranks so that the ordered id is matched up with corresponding ordered number.

The first INNER JOIN subselect will look like this:

id   |   id_rank
---------------
2    |   1
3    |   2
6    |   3
7    |   4
10   |   5
11   |   6
12   |   7
15   |   8

Then the second INNER JOIN subselect will like this:

number   |   number_rank
---------------
534      |   5
421      |   4
2038     |   7
41       |   2
5383     |   8
5        |   1
933      |   6
43       |   3

Then when you join the two subselects on id_rank = number_rank, you line the ascending order of the two fields up. Once you have that, updating becomes a simple matter of setting the table's number = the second joined table's number.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.