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Whats the most suitable pattern that can be used for the method below. I'm leaning towards strategy pattern for the switch statements but how about the if's. Also what if I'll have different type of discounts should I use the strategy pattern as well?

public void AddOrder(PaymentType paymentType, OrderType orderType)
{
    if (orderType == OrderType.Sale)
    {
        switch (paymentType)
        {
            case PaymentType.Cash:
                // Do cash calculations here
                break;
            case PaymentType.CreditCard:
                // Do credit card calculations here
                break;                    
        }
    }
    else if (orderType == OrderType.Refund)
    {
        switch (paymentType)
        {
            case PaymentType.Cash:
                // Do cash calculations here
                break;
            case PaymentType.CreditCard:
                // Do credit card calculations here
                break;
            }
        }            
    }

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Stratergy pattern is best pattern in this situation but you can also use decorator pattern also do decorate product with proper taxes – Ajay Beniwal Jun 24 '12 at 8:34
    
Thanks Ajay. How would be the strategy pattern implemented here? I mean will I have strategy pattern for determining OrderType then inside it another strategy pattern for PaymentType? – gnaungayan Jun 24 '12 at 11:04

If you look at your code, what you basically want is to have PaymentType handle two kinds of orders. So if you implement PaymentType as an abstract class with two methods - sale and refund - you have the basis for a strategy pattern.

You would then implement two concrete kinds of PaymentType (Cash and CreditCard), and then configure a suitable object with the kind of payment being used.

For your example I really think that Strategy is overkill. It may also be the wrong fit, as Strategy is usually used to configure a global default. Here it looks like you want to be able to process a bunch of transactions regardless of their actual concrete type.

You are probably much better off just using simple polymorphy combined with Command Pattern here, such as...

public interface Transaction {
  void perform();
}

public interface PaymentType {
  void sale();
  void refund();
}

public class Sale implements Transaction {
  private final PaymentType paymentType;

  public Sale(final PaymentType paymentType) {
    this.paymentType = paymentType;
  }

  public void perform() {
    paymentType.sale();
  }

}


public class Refund implements Transaction {
  private final PaymentType paymentType;

  public Refund(final PaymentType paymentType) {
    this.paymentType = paymentType;
  }

  public void perform() {
    paymentType.refund();
  }

}

Now you can do:

public void AddOrder(final Transaction transaction) {
  transaction.perform();
}

You have now decoupled AddOrder from any knowledge of whether the transaction is a sale or a refund, and which kind of payment is used. This makes it easy to add a new kind of transaction (layaway...) and new payment methods (debet card).

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