Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When modeling a supertype/subtype relationship with several mutually-exclusive subtypes, how should this mutually exclusivity be enforced by constraints?

My first guess would be:

SuperType
  (PK) super_id
  (PK) type_id
  Constraint: type_id in (1,2)

SubType1
  (FK) super_id
  (FK) type_id
  Constraint: type_id = 1


SubType2
  (FK) super_id
  (FK) type_id
  Constraint: type_id = 2
share|improve this question
1  
Yes, that's the way to do this. You can also have SuperType(type_id) as an FK to a Types reference table (with just 2 rows). – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jun 24 '12 at 9:27
    
Another similar problem: Database design problem – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jun 24 '12 at 9:37
    
I agree with ypercube. You have the right idea. This is the most you can do with constraints. As Branko points out, this doesn't address widowed supertypes, but constraints (even reciprical FKs) aren't going to be a good answer for that part of the problem because of the complexity that they can cause. Just use a bit of application logic to address the widowed supertype issue. – Joel Brown Jun 24 '12 at 12:22

What you describe still doesn't enforce the presence of the child row.

For that, you'd need to ditch the type discriminator and add a FK in opposite direction, which would cause circular FKs, which would require deferred constraints to resolve - something like this.

I personally think it's better to just use the most straightforward database model possible...

SuperType
  (PK) super_id

SubType1
  (PK, FK) super_id

SubType1
  (PK, FK) super_id

...and enforce exclusivity and presence of children at the application level.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.