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I am using recursion and I want an Integer object to retain its value across recursive calls. e.g.

public void recursiveMethod(Integer counter) {
    if (counter == 10)
        return;
    else {
        counter++;
        recursiveMethod(counter);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Integer c = new Integer(5);
    new TestSort().recursiveMethod(c);
    System.out.println(c); // print 5
}

But in the below code (where I am using a Counter class instead of Integer wrapper class, the value is maintained

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Counter c = new Counter(5);
    new TestSort().recursiveMethod(c);
    System.out.println(c.getCount()); // print 10
}

public void recursiveMethod(Counter counter) {
    if (counter.getCount() == 10)
        return;
    else {
        counter.increaseByOne();
        recursiveMethod(counter);
    }
}

class Counter {

    int count = 0;

    public Counter(int count) {
        this.count = count;
    }

    public int getCount() {
        return this.count;
    }

    public void increaseByOne() {
        count++;
    }
}

so why primitve wrapper class behaves differently. After all, both are objects and in the reucrsive call, I am passing the Integer object and not just int so that Integer object must also maintain its value.

share|improve this question
    
You should simplify the code examples; the recursion is irrelevant... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 24 '12 at 12:21
    
@Oli the above code is just for the explanation of my doubt. So there is no point of irrelevancy... You should have understood this by yourself. I should say that your comment is irrelevant on this question. –  Yatendra Goel Jun 24 '12 at 13:46
    
The reason I said that is because when you are trying to make sense of some behaviour that you don't understand, it usually helps to reduce it to the simplest possible test-case (i.e. eliminate everything that's not relevant to the core problem). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 24 '12 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The Java wrapper types are immutable. Their values never change.

counter++ is really counter = counter + 1; i.e. a new object gets created.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for concise and to the point answer –  Yatendra Goel Jun 24 '12 at 13:46

Some of the objects like String , Integer etc....are immutable even if they are objects....

try this link......

http://www.javaranch.com/journal/2003/04/immutable.htm

I recommend you do the following......

         public void recursiveMethod(Integer counter) 
         {
            if (counter == 10)
            return counter;  // return the value
            else 
            {
                    counter++;
                    counter=recursiveMethod(counter);
             }
         }

         public static void main(String[] args) 
         {
           Integer c = new Integer(5);
           c=(Integer)new TestSort().recursiveMethod(c);
           System.out.println(c); // print 5
          }

The only difference i believe u'll find on using both would be

using int is like using java primitives like any other language whereas Integer contains methods like wait(), notify(),parsing,hashcode etc.....

share|improve this answer
1  
@OliCharlesworth well my point is just to say java objects like Integer, String etc..are immutable....and i've just edited thee code and didn't considered taking into account it's compliation.... –  Arjun K P Jun 24 '12 at 18:57

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