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I have two "if" statements in my code, what can I do so that if one "if" statement is true the other is automatically ignored / disabled?

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2  
read up on "else", the part of an "if" statement that gets executed if the condition is false. –  Tony Ennis Jun 24 '12 at 12:16
1  
I know the problem is, there are certain conditions where both of the "if" statements can become true.. therefore I am having two if conditions doing there job at the same time... What do you think? –  Matthew Jun 24 '12 at 12:17
1  
@Matthew You may require to use return before going to next if. –  Ravinder Jun 24 '12 at 12:19
4  
else if maybe? –  DrColossos Jun 24 '12 at 12:21
2  
Not sure this should have been closed. The guy is 'getting there.' –  Tony Ennis Jun 24 '12 at 12:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So you have the following:

if(condition1){
   block1;
}
if(condition2){
   block2;
}else{
   block3;
}

To disable/ignore the second if you can either use an else if statement:

if(condition1){
   block1;
} else if(condition2){
   block2;
}else{
   block3;
}

Or a return statement after block1

if(condition1){
   block1;
   return;
}
if(condition2){
   block2;
}else{
   block3;
}
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what is the purpose of the "return;" in general? I cannot understand it :S –  Matthew Jun 24 '12 at 13:03
3  
The return basically means: I AM DONE, DON'T BOTHER GOING ANY FURTHER :) –  GETah Jun 24 '12 at 13:22
1  
This solution addresses the symptom. –  Tony Ennis Jun 24 '12 at 13:34
1  
@TonyEnnis I disagree. The OP's question is how to ignore the second if statement not about re-factoring his code –  GETah Jun 24 '12 at 13:42
    if(maxValY < 3)
    {
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 740,490);
        p.drawString(aw,840,490);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 740,510);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah,846,510);
    } 
    else
    {   if (minValx == -1 || minValx == - 2 || minValx == - 3){
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 740,90);
        p.drawString(aw,840,90);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 740,110);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah,846,110);
        }
        else{
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 50,90);
        p.drawString(aw,150,90);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 50,110);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah,156,110);
        }
   }
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There are two answers, at least. One is to put a return statement at the bottom of the 1st if statement. I don't like that because it may not be a good general solution.

Another answer is to restructure your code a little...

First, since the case is where maxValX is >= 3 doesn't seem to be where the problem lies, I'd get that out of the way by reversing the first if conditional:

    if (maxValY >= 3) {
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 50, 90);
        p.drawString(aw, 150, 90);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 50, 110);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah, 156, 110);
    } else if (maxValY < 3) {
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 740, 490);
        p.drawString(aw, 840, 490);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 740, 510);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah, 846, 510);
    }
    if (minValx == -1 || minValx == -2 || minValx == -3) {
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 740, 90);
        p.drawString(aw, 840, 90);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 740, 110);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah, 846, 110);
    }

So all that happened was that I put the 'non duplicate if statement issue' at the top.

Now, we have two conditions, one that deals with minValX, and one that deals with maxValY. But we now notice that the contents of each are nearly identical. We solve this by refactoring the code a little (and sneaking in an else...):

    if (maxValY >= 3) {
        p.setColor(Color.black);
        //display the value of graph width and graph height
        aw = String.valueOf(x1);
        p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 50, 90);
        p.drawString(aw, 150, 90);
        p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 50, 110);
        String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
        p.drawString(ah, 156, 110);
    } else if (maxValY < 3) {
        q(491, 510);
    } else if (minValx == -1 || minValx == -2 || minValx == -3) {
        q(90, 110);
    } else {
        throw new RuntimeException("This cannot possibly happen ;-)");
    }
}

private void q(int loc1, int loc2) {
    p.setColor(Color.black);
    //display the value of graph width and graph height
    aw = String.valueOf(x1);
    p.drawString("Graph Width = ", 740, loc1);
    p.drawString(aw, 840, loc1);
    p.drawString("Graph Height = ", 740, loc2);
    String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
    p.drawString(ah, 846, loc2);
}

And then we notice the code blocks are still nearly identical. Refactor...

private void someName() {
    // ...
    if (maxValY >= 3) {
        q(50, 90, 510);
    } else if (maxValY < 3) {
        q(740, 490, 510);
    } else if (minValx == -1 || minValx == -2 || minValx == -3) {
        q(740, 90, 110);
    } else {
        throw new RuntimeException("This cannot possibly happen ;-)");
    }
    // ...
}

private void q(int base, int graphWidth, int graphHeight) {
    p.setColor(Color.black);
    //display the value of graph width and graph height
    aw = String.valueOf(x1);
    p.drawString("Graph Width = ", base, graphWidth);
    p.drawString(aw, base+100, graphWidth);
    p.drawString("Graph Height = ", base, graphHeight);
    String ah = String.valueOf(y1);
    p.drawString(ah, base+100+6, graphHeight);
}

So we see that all three sections of code were basically the same except for some constants. By refactoring them out, we reduce the amount of code that must be debugged. In addition, we see the structure of the if statement clearly and have separated the logic from the actual work, which frequently yields additional dividends.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP's question is how to ignore the second if statement not about re-factoring his code –  GETah Jun 24 '12 at 13:43
    
@GETah Yep. And with this solution, the OP gets what he wanted, using the preferred construct, and hopefully learns a little more beyond that. Beginners often ask the wrong question, and this was the case here. –  Tony Ennis Jun 24 '12 at 13:50

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