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Possible Duplicate:
Python append() vs. + operator on lists, why do these give different results?

What is the actual difference between "+" and "append" for list manipulation in Python?

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marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, Lev Levitsky, katrielalex, John La Rooy, Tadeck Jun 24 '12 at 13:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

There are two major differences. The first is that + is closer in meaning to .extend than to .append:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> a + 4
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#13>", line 1, in <module>
    a + 4
TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "int") to list
>>> a + [4]
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> a.append([4])
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, [4]]
>>> a.extend([4])
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, [4], 4]

The other, more prominent, difference is that the methods work in-place: .extend is actually like += - in fact, it has exactly the same behavior as += except that it can accept any iterable, while += can only take another list.

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thanks for that, it was very helpful! – Bups Jun 25 '12 at 2:27

Using list.append modifies the list in place - its result is None. Using + creates a new list.

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>>> L1 = [1,2,3]
>>> L2 = [97,98,99]
>>>
>>> # Mutate L1 by appending more values:
>>> L1.append(4)
>>> L1
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>>
>>> # Create a new list by adding L1 and L2 together
>>> L1 + L2
[1, 2, 3, 4, 97, 98, 99]
>>> # L1 and L2 are unchanged
>>> L1
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> L2
[97, 98, 99]
>>>
>>> # Mutate L2 by adding new values to it:
>>> L2 += [999]
>>> L2
[97, 98, 99, 999]
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The + operation adds the array elements to the original array. The array.append operation inserts the array (or any object) into the end of the original array.

[1, 2, 3] + [4, 5, 6] // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

b = [1, 2, 3]
b.append([4, 5, 6]) // [1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 6]]

Take a look here: Python append() vs. + operator on lists, why do these give different results?

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+ is a binary operator that produces a new list resulting from a concatenation of two operand lists. append is an instance method that appends a single element to an existing list.

P.S. Did you mean extend?

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