Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to write header file. I can write simple headers like add(int x, y) return x+y; . But when I tried to get more complicated, visual studio gave error. I guess error is related to <fstream>. It always shows

"error C2065: 'fstream' : undeclared identifier ".

First line of my cpp file is void get_int(fstream& stream, int offset) (except #include<fstream>) and first definiton of .h file is

#ifndef GET_H
#define GET_H

int get_int(fstream& stream, int offset);

#endif

It goes like this. What is wrong with this code?

share|improve this question
    
Add Include <fstream> – Alok Save Jun 24 '12 at 13:06
    
I added at first time in cpp file.But it still gives error.And i also added that in .h file then i deleted it. – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:08
    
Your header file needs to have the include. – Alok Save Jun 24 '12 at 13:09
    
my .cpp file like this #include <fstream> #include "imagelib.h" and my .h file #include <fstream> then it still gives error.I did not use anything requires other header file. – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You must do this:

#ifndef GET_H
#define GET_H

#include <fstream>

int get_int(std::fstream& stream, int offset);

#endif

Notice the #include <fstream> and the added std:: prefix. The qualification is needed because all C++ Standard library... things... are defined in that namespace. You should not add a using namespace std; or using std::fstream; in a header, because that pollutes the global namespace and defeats the purpose of the existence of namespace std: people including your header don't expect stuff to be pulled into the global namespace, which may conflict with naming used by others.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, i will consider this. – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:42
    
if i use #pragma once, can i use namespace std without any conflict? I am confused because of other answers. – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:51
    
No. #pragma once is just a nonstandard "quick" way of header guards. It is independent of using statements. I would even tend to suggest against it (although it is supported by all major compilers), because of its non-standardness. You'll get the hang of and learn to appreciate the std:: and other namespace prefixes once you notice using the same names in different contexts (but prefixed with different namespace names) simplifies readability in the long run. – rubenvb Jun 24 '12 at 13:56
    
Thank you again, i changed my code again but this was last :) – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 14:05
#include <fstream>

must be in your header file as well. It goes into the including translation unit, but it still needs to see it because upon expanding inside the .cpp file, it ends up above the #include of fstream. This way you make sure that order won't affect compilation because inclusion guards are in place. It won't try to expand it twice. Also, #pragma once saves kittens.

The reason your ordering gives the same errors is because your header lacks "using std::goeshere" etc.

Code sample as a followup in the comments (preventing namespace pollution):

#ifndef GET_H
#define GET_H

#include <fstream>
using std::fstream;

int get_int(fstream& stream, int offset);

#endif

or (#pragma once should be supported by all decent compilers)

#pragma once

#include <fstream>
using std::fstream;

int get_int(fstream& stream, int offset);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, i solved problem with "using namaspace std;" – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:26
1  
@TalhaÇolakoğlu, don't. Use std:: before names, because using namespace std; pulls way too much symbols into global namespace - which can lead you to really unexpected results. – Griwes Jun 24 '12 at 13:30
    
thank you, i replaced it. – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:33
    
@TalhaÇolakoğlu Or you can use "using std::fstream" for identifiers of choice which are located in a specific namespace, in this case namespace std – user1309389 Jun 24 '12 at 13:35
    
Thanks, this is more useful than other :) But i think this is harmful.I understand that other answer. – Talha Çolakoğlu Jun 24 '12 at 13:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.