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I'm trying to speed up a computation for a neural simulator using the FFT.

The equation is:

(1) \sum(j=1 to N) (w(i - j) * s_NMDA[j])

where s_NMDA is a vector of length N and w is defined by:

(2) w(j) = tanh[1/(2 * sigma * p)] * exp(-abs(j) / (sigma * p)]

where sigma and p are constants.

(is there a better way to render equations on stackoverflow?)

The calculation has to be done for N neurons. Since (1) only depends on the absolute distance abs(i - j), it should be possible to compute this using the FFT (convolution theorem).

I've tried to implement this using FFTW but the results do not match with the expected results. I've never used FFTW before and now I'm not sure if my implementation is incorrect of if my assumptions about the convolution theorem are false.

void f_I_NMDA_FFT(
    const double     **states, // states[i][6] == s_NMDA[i]
    const unsigned int numNeurons)
{
    fftw_complex *distances, *sNMDAs, *convolution;
    fftw_complex *distances_f, *sNMDAs_f, *convolution_f;
    fftw_plan     p, pinv;
    const double scale = 1./numNeurons;

        distances = (fftw_complex *)fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * numNeurons);
        sNMDAs    = (fftw_complex *)fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * numNeurons);
        convolution = (fftw_complex *)fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * numNeurons);
        distances_f = (fftw_complex *)fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * numNeurons);
        sNMDAs_f    = (fftw_complex *)fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * numNeurons);
        convolution_f    = (fftw_complex *)fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * numNeurons);

        // fill input array for distances  
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numNeurons; ++i)
    {
        distances[i][0] = w(i);
        distances[i][1] = 0;
    }

        // fill input array for sNMDAs
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numNeurons; ++i)
    {
        sNMDAs[i][0] = states[i][6];
        sNMDAs[i][1] = 0;
    }

    p = fftw_plan_dft_1d(numNeurons,
                         distances,
                         distances_f,
                         FFTW_FORWARD,
                         FFTW_ESTIMATE);
    fftw_execute(p);

    p = fftw_plan_dft_1d(numNeurons,
                         sNMDAs,
                         sNMDAs_f,
                         FFTW_FORWARD,
                         FFTW_ESTIMATE);
    fftw_execute(p);

    // convolution in frequency domain
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < numNeurons; ++i)
    {
        convolution_f[i][0] = (distances_f[i][0] * sNMDAs_f[i][0]
            - distances_f[i][1] * sNMDAs_f[i][1]) * scale;
        convolution_f[i][1] = (distances_f[i][0] * sNMDAs_f[i][1]
            - distances_f[i][1] * sNMDAs_f[i][0]) * scale;
    }

    pinv = fftw_plan_dft_1d(numNeurons,
                            convolution_f,
                            convolution,
                            FFTW_FORWARD,
                            FFTW_ESTIMATE);
    fftw_execute(pinv);

    // compute and compare with expected result
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numNeurons; ++i)
    {
            double expected = 0;

            for (int j = 0; j < numNeurons; ++j)
            {
                expected += w(i - j) * states[j][6];
            }
            printf("i=%d, FFT: r%f, i%f : Expected: %f\n", i, convolution[i][0], convolution[i][1], expected);
    }

    fftw_destroy_plan(p);
    fftw_destroy_plan(pinv);

    fftw_free(distances), fftw_free(sNMDAs), fftw_free(convolution);
    fftw_free(distances_f), fftw_free(sNMDAs_f), fftw_free(convolution_f);

Here's an example output for 20 neurons:

i=0, FFT: r0.042309, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.041504
i=1, FFT: r0.042389, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.042639
i=2, FFT: r0.042466, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.043633
i=3, FFT: r0.042543, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.044487
i=4, FFT: r0.041940, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.045203
i=5, FFT: r0.041334, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.045963
i=6, FFT: r0.041405, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.046585
i=7, FFT: r0.041472, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047070
i=8, FFT: r0.041537, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047419
i=9, FFT: r0.041600, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047631
i=10, FFT: r0.041660, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047708
i=11, FFT: r0.041717, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047649
i=12, FFT: r0.041773, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047454
i=13, FFT: r0.041826, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.047123
i=14, FFT: r0.041877, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.046656
i=15, FFT: r0.041926, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.046052
i=16, FFT: r0.041294, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.045310
i=17, FFT: r0.042059, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.044430
i=18, FFT: r0.042144, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.043412
i=19, FFT: r0.042228, i0.000000 : Expected: 0.042253

The results seem to be almost correct, but the error increases with the number of neurons. Also, the results seem to be more accurate for positions (i) that are very low or very high. What's going on here?

Update: As suggested by Oli Charlesworth, I implemented the algorithm in octave to see if it's a implementation or math problem:

input = [0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775];

function ret = _w(i)
  ret = tanh(1 / (2* 1 * 32)) * exp(-abs(i) / (1 * 32));
end

for i = linspace(1, 10, 10)
  expected = 0;
  for j = linspace(1, 10, 10)
    expected += _w(i-j) * input(j);
  end
  expected
end

distances = _w(transpose(linspace(0, 9, 10)));

input_f = fft(input);
distances_f = fft(distances);

convolution_f = input_f .* distances_f;

convolution = ifft(convolution_f)

Results:

expected =  0.022959
expected =  0.023506
expected =  0.023893
expected =  0.024121
expected =  0.024190
expected =  0.024100
expected =  0.024034
expected =  0.023808
expected =  0.023424
expected =  0.022880
convolution =

   0.022959
   0.023036
   0.023111
   0.023183
   0.023253
   0.022537
   0.022627
   0.022714
   0.022798
   0.022880

The results are very much the same. Therefore, there must be something wrong with my understanding of the convolution theorem / FFT.

share|improve this question
1  
StackOverflow has no direct support for Latex. However, you can use a site like codecogs.com/latex/eqneditor.php, which dynamically generates images. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 24 '12 at 14:29
    
As for the core problem, I think you first need to establish whether you're looking at a maths problem or an FFTW problem. I would suggest prototyping your algorithm in something like Matlab/Octave. Alternatively, you could try performing the calculation with a naive DFT algorithm (it's about 7 lines of code). If that works, then you know you're doing something wrong with FFTW! –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 24 '12 at 14:32
    
Thanks for your suggestions. Unfortunately, I can't include images because I don't have enough reputation yet. I'll try to implement a simple prototype in octave and compare the results. –  nebw Jun 24 '12 at 14:48
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2 Answers

To convolve 2 signals via FFT you generally need to do this:

  1. Add as many zeroes to every signal as necessary so its length becomes the cumulative length of the original signals - 1 (that's the length of the result of the convolution).
  2. If your FFT library requires input lengths to be powers of 2, add to every signal as many zeroes as necessary to meet that requirement too.
  3. Calculate the DFT of signal 1 (via FFT).
  4. Calculate the DFT of signal 2 (via FFT).
  5. Multiply the two DFTs element-wise. It should be a complex multiplication, btw.
  6. Calculate the inverse DFT (via FFT) of the multiplied DFTs. That'll be your convolution result.

In your code I see FFTW_FORWARD in all 3 FFTs. I'm guessing if that's not the problem, it's part of it. The last FFT should be "backward", not "forward".

Also, I think you need "+" in the 2nd expression, not "-":

convolution_f[i][0] = (distances_f[i][0] * sNMDAs_f[i][0]
            - distances_f[i][1] * sNMDAs_f[i][1]) * scale;

convolution_f[i][1] = (distances_f[i][0] * sNMDAs_f[i][1]
            - distances_f[i][1] * sNMDAs_f[i][0]) * scale;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. You're correct about the two mistakes in my code. They were only part of the problem, though. There was another problem with the order of the distances array, but I can't answer my own question for the next five hours because I have less than 10 reputation, so I guess I'll have to wait before I can post it... –  nebw Jun 24 '12 at 16:58
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I finally solved the problem, thanks a lot to Alex and Oli Charlesworth for your suggestions!

function ret = _w(i)
  ret = tanh(1 / (2* 1 * 32)) * exp(-abs(i) / (1 * 32));
end

_input = [0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775; 0.186775];
n = size(_input)(1);

input = _input;

for i = linspace(1, n, n)
  expected = 0;
  for j = linspace(1, n, n)
    expected += _w(i-j) * input(j);
  end
  expected
end

input = vertcat(_input, zeros((2*n)-n-1,1));

distances = _w(transpose(linspace(0, (2*n)-n-1, n)));
distances = vertcat(flipud(distances), distances(2:end));

input_f = fft(input);
distances_f = fft(distances);

convolution_f = input_f .* distances_f;

convolution = ifft(convolution_f)(n:end)

Results:

expected =  0.022959
expected =  0.023506
expected =  0.023893
expected =  0.024121
expected =  0.024190
expected =  0.024100
expected =  0.024034
expected =  0.023808
expected =  0.023424
expected =  0.022880
convolution =

   0.022959
   0.023506
   0.023893
   0.024121
   0.024190
   0.024100
   0.024034
   0.023808
   0.023424
   0.022880

I basically forgot to order the distances array in the correct way. If anyone is interested, I can provide a more detailed explanation later on.

Update: (Explanation)

Here's what my distances vector (for 5 neurons) looked liked initially:

i =  1       2       3       4       5

| _w(0) | _w(1) | _w(2) | _w(3) | _w(4) |

On this vector, I applied a kernel, e.g.:

|  0.1  |  0.1  |  0.0  |  0.2  |  0.3  |

Since I was using cyclic convolution, the result for the first neuron _w(0) was:

0.0 * _w(2) + 0.1 * _w(1) + 0.1 * _w(0) + 0.1 * _w(1) + 0.0 * _w(2)

But this is incorrect, the result should be:

0.1 * _w(0) + 0.1 * _w(1) + 0.0 * _w(2) + 0.2 * _w(3) + 0.3 * _w(4)

To achieve that, I had to "mirror" my distances vector and add some padding to the kernel:

input = vertcat(_input, zeros((2*n)-n-1,1));
distances = _w(transpose(linspace(0, (2*n)-n-1, n)));
distances = _w(transpose(linspace(0, (2*n)-n-1, n)));

i =  1       2        3       4       5       6       7       8       9

| _w(4) | _w(3)  | _w(2) | _w(1) | _w(0) | _w(1) | _w(2) | _w(3) | _w(4) |

|  0.1  |  0.1   |  0.0  |  0.2  |  0.3  |  0    |  0    |  0    |  0    |

Now, if I apply the convolution, the results for i = [5:9] are exactly the results I was looking for, so I'll only have to discard [1:4] and I'm done :)

convolution = ifft(convolution_f)(n:end)
share|improve this answer
    
So, your solution doesn't involve C(++) code and FFTW anymore? I guess, what I'm trying to say, an answer to a question on StackOverflow should answer the original question and not just be a mere "thanks, it works now", which is what this "answer" looks. You may answer your own question, that's fine, but it should be an answer nonetheless, not just a conversation. For that we have comments, where this "answer", I believe, belongs. If you've been helped by others' answers, please vote them up and/or accept, whatever is appropriate. That's how SO works. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 24 '12 at 22:47
    
Hey, as stated in the update to my question, the problem turned out to be a math problem, and not a FFTW problem as I originally thought. While Alex's reply was really helpful for me, it didn't solve the actual problem I was facing, so I didn't accept his answer. I wanted to upvote him, but I don't have enough reputation to do that. The reason why my answer includes only matlab code and no C++ code is because people can try the matlab code for themselves, while the C++ code in my original question is a part of a bigger program and doesn't run on it's own. –  nebw Jun 25 '12 at 9:00
    
Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm new to SO. I can also post an updated C++ version, but I don't really see the point since, apart from the two problems Alex mentioned, there's nothing wrong with the code, it just doesn't do what I was expecting it to do initially. –  nebw Jun 25 '12 at 9:09
    
The point is, if nobody's answer really helped you or you have the best answer, you're free to answer your own question (and even accept it). But I don't think this is the case here as you have been pointed at 2 major mistakes in your C++ implementation and you confirmed by other means (what was that language?) that the algorithm is correct and it's only the C++ implementation that's wrong. In this case, IMHO, your answer should be deleted, and mine accepted. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 25 '12 at 9:14
    
Actually, what I confirmed with my Matlab/Octave implementation was that my algorithm was not correct and that the mistakes in my C++ implementation were only part of the problem. I expanded my answer so that it explains more thoroughly my actual solution. I guess I could still mark your answer as accepted (since it still helped me to fix my C++ implementation), but the actual solution to my problem is in my answer. –  nebw Jun 25 '12 at 9:45
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