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I'm trying to solve this problem in a pure-functional way, without using set!.

I've written a function that calls a given lambda for each number in the fibonacci series, forever.

(define (each-fib fn)
  (letrec
    ((next (lambda (a b)
             (fn a)
             (next b (+ a b)))))
    (next 0 1)))

I think this is as succinct as it can be, but if I can shorten this, please enlighten me :)

With a definition like the above, is it possible to write another function that takes the first n numbers from the fibonacci series and gives me a list back, but without using variable mutation to track the state (which I understand is not really functional).

The function signature doesn't need to be the same as the following... any approach that will utilize each-fib without using set! is fine.

(take-n-fibs 7) ; (0 1 1 2 3 5 8)

I'm guessing there's some sort of continuations + currying trick I can use, but I keep coming back to wanting to use set!, which is what I'm trying to avoid (purely for learning purposes/shifting my thinking to purely functional).

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The more I think about this, the more I'm starting to realize it's impossible, without changing the definition of each-fib to take the count. –  d11wtq Jun 24 '12 at 14:25
    
Indeed each-fib has to be changed somehow, but set! can be avoided (meaning: no explicit mutation is required) –  Óscar López Jun 24 '12 at 17:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this, implemented using lazy code by means of delayed evaluation:

(define (each-fib fn)
  (letrec
      ((next (lambda (a b)
               (fn a)
               (delay (next b (+ a b))))))
    (next 0 1)))

(define (take-n-fibs n fn)
  (let loop ((i n)
             (promise (each-fib fn)))
    (when (positive? i)
      (loop (sub1 i) (force promise)))))

As has been mentioned, each-fib can be further simplified by using a named let:

(define (each-fib fn)
  (let next ((a 0) (b 1))
    (fn a)
    (delay (next b (+ a b)))))

Either way, it was necessary to modify each-fib a little for using the delay primitive, which creates a promise:

A promise encapsulates an expression to be evaluated on demand via force. After a promise has been forced, every later force of the promise produces the same result.

I can't think of a way to stop the original (unmodified) procedure from iterating indefinitely. But with the above change in place, take-n-fibs can keep forcing the lazy evaluation of as many values as needed, and no more.

Also, take-n-fibs now receives a function for printing or processing each value in turn, use it like this:

(take-n-fibs 10 (lambda (n) (printf "~a " n)))
> 0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55
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2  
I like this solution. –  soegaard Jun 24 '12 at 18:22
1  
This looks great, thanks! –  d11wtq Jun 25 '12 at 10:58

You provide an iteration function over fibonacci elements. If you want, instead of iterating over each element, to accumulate a result, you should use a different primitive that would be a fold (or reduce) rather than an iter.
(It might be possible to use continuations to turn an iter into a fold, but that will probably be less readable and less efficient that a direct solution using either a fold or mutation.)

Note however that using an accumulator updated by mutation is also fine, as long as you understand what you are doing: you are using mutable state locally for convenience, but the function take-n-fibs is, seen from the outside, observationally pure, so you do not "contaminate" your program as a whole with side effects.

A quick prototype for fold-fib, adapted from your own code. I made an arbitrary choice as to "when stop folding": if the function returns null, we return the current accumulator instead of continuing folding.

(define (fold-fib init fn) (letrec ([next (lambda (acc a b)
      (let ([acc2 (fn acc a)])
        (if (null? acc2) acc
            (next acc2 b (+ a b)))))])
      (next init 0 1)))

(reverse (fold-fib '() (lambda (acc n) (if (> n 10) null (cons n acc)))))

It would be better to have a more robust convention to end folding.

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I have written few variants. First you ask if

(define (each-fib fn)
  (letrec
    ((next (lambda (a b)
             (fn a)
             (next b (+ a b)))))
    (next 0 1)))

can be written any shorter. The pattern is used so often that special syntax called named let has been introduced. Your function looks like this using a named let:

(define (each-fib fn)
  (let next ([a 0] [b 1])
    (fn a)
    (next b (+ a b))))

In order to get the control flowing from one function to another, one can in languages with supports TCO use continuation passing style. Each function gets an extra argument often called k (for continuation). The function k represents what-to-do-next.

Using this style, one can write your program as follows:

(define (generate-fibs k)
  (let next ([a 0] [b 1] [k k])
    (k a (lambda (k1) 
           (next b (+ a b) k1)))))

(define (count-down n k)
  (let loop ([n n] [fibs '()] [next generate-fibs])
    (if (zero? n)
        (k fibs)
        (next (λ (a next)
                (loop (- n 1) (cons a fibs) next))))))

(count-down 5 values)

Now it is a bit annoying to write in style manually, so it could be convenient to introduce the co-routines. Breaking your rule of not using set! I have chosen to use a shared variable fibs in which generate-fibs repeatedly conses new fibonacci numbers onto. The count-down routine merely read the values, when the count down is over.

(define (make-coroutine co-body)
  (letrec ([state (lambda () (co-body resume))]
           [resume (lambda (other)
                     (call/cc (lambda (here)
                                (set! state here)
                                (other))))])
    (lambda ()
      (state))))

(define fibs '())

(define generate-fib
  (make-coroutine 
   (lambda (resume)
     (let next ([a 0] [b 1])
       (set! fibs (cons a fibs))
       (resume count-down)
       (next b (+ a b))))))

(define count-down
  (make-coroutine   
   (lambda (resume)
     (let loop ([n 10])
       (if (zero? n)
           fibs
           (begin
             (resume generate-fib)
             (loop (- n 1))))))))

(count-down)     

And a bonus you get a version with communicating threads:

#lang racket
(letrec ([result #f]
         [count-down 
          (thread 
           (λ ()
             (let loop ([n 10] [fibs '()])
               (if (zero? n)
                   (set! result fibs)
                   (loop (- n 1) (cons (thread-receive) fibs))))))] 

         [produce-fibs
          (thread
           (λ ()
             (let next ([a 0] [b 1])
               (when (thread-running? count-down)
                 (thread-send count-down a)
                 (next b (+ a b))))))])
  (thread-wait count-down)
  result)

The thread version is Racket specific, the others ought to run anywhere.

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Building a list would be hard. But displaying the results can still be done (in a very bad fashion)

#lang racket

(define (each-fib fn)
  (letrec
    ((next (lambda (a b)
             (fn a)
             (next b (+ a b)))))
    (next 0 1)))



(define (take-n-fibs n fn)
  (let/cc k
        (begin
          (each-fib (lambda (x) 
                      (if (= x (fib (+ n 1)))
                          (k (void))
                          (begin
                            (display (fn x))
                            (newline))))))))


(define fib
  (lambda (n)
    (letrec ((f
              (lambda (i a b)
                (if (<= n i)
                    a
                    (f (+ i 1) b (+ a b))))))
      (f 1 0 1))))

Notice that i am using the regular fibonacci function as an escape (like i said, in a very bad fashion). I guess nobody will recommend programming like this.

Anyway

(take-n-fibs 7 (lambda (x) (* x x))) 
0
1
1
4
9
25
64
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