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The title may be incorrect, if so please change. I'm not sure how to ask my question so just look at the code as it should be obvious.

Using the commented code will work but I want to know why the actual code does not work. I'm sure it's wrong but how can it be fixed? Or is this not how its done?

using System;

namespace SomethingAwful.TestCases.Structs
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            Foo f = new Foo();
            f.Bar.Baz = 1;

            Console.WriteLine(f.Bar.Baz);
        }
    }

    public class Foo
    {
        public struct FooBar
        {
            private int baz;

            public int Baz
            {
                get
                {
                    return baz;
                }
                set
                {
                    baz = value;
                }
            }

            public FooBar(int baz)
            {
                this.baz = baz;
            }
        }

        private FooBar bar;

        public FooBar Bar
        {
            get
            {
                return bar;
            }
            set
            {
                bar = value;
            }
        }

        //public FooBar Bar;

        public Foo()
        {
            this.bar = new FooBar();
            //this.Bar = new FooBar();
        }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A struct is copied only by value, so all you wind up doing is changing the copy that was returned. Use a class.

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Use

Foo.FooBar myFooBar = new Foo.FooBar { Baz = 1 };
f.Bar = myFooBar;

Like Steven said, you need to create an instance of a struct, and set the property to it. Otherwise it is passed by value.

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1  
That's correct. This sort of unexpected behavior is part of the argument for struct's being immutable. –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 5:50
    
@Steven Sudit: Sort of. What should happen would be that only struct methods/properties that were specially declared as mutators would be allowed to modify 'this', and the use of such methods/properties would be forbidden in read-only contexts. Further, the system should provide a means of implementing true reference-type properties. They could be implemented more safely and efficiently than closures, but unfortunately without language support the syntax ends up being pretty horrific. I'd love to chat on the subject if anyone's interested. –  supercat Jul 21 '11 at 23:03
    
@super: Rather than mutating this, better to create a copy that differs in the specified value. –  Steven Sudit Jul 26 '11 at 0:57
    
@Steven Sudit: If one has an array-like structure of Rectangle, it would be much more convenient, readable, and efficient to say something like "SomeObject[index].Width = 50;", than to say "SomeObject[index] = New Rectangle(SomeObject[index].Left, SomeObject[index].Top, SomeObject[index].Width, 50);" or even "SomeObject[index] = SomeObject[index].WithHeight(50);" An addressable collection of mutable value types is often the right data structure for many purposes; there's no reason why attempting to read SomeObject[index].Left should create a new object instance, but... –  supercat Jul 26 '11 at 14:43
    
...nor is there any reason why an access to SomeObject[index] should give the caller a reference to something that can be used to modify the internals of SomeObject at any arbitrary time in the future. What I'd like to see would be for a statement like "SomeObject[index].Height=newHeight;" to be translated into a method "static void m1(ref Rectangle it, ref int p1) {it.Height = p1;}" and a call "SomeObject.access_indexed(index, m1, ref NewHeight);". Because the method would be static, there would be no need to instantiate a new class object at runtime. The primary difficulty I see... –  supercat Jul 26 '11 at 14:49

Also, you can think of the struct as "already allocated", so you don't need too new() it. Instead of

this.Bar = new FooBar();

Just do

this.Bar.Baz = 1;
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