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i tried to get a file list sorted, without sucess.

it gets the files recursively but without any order.

here's the code:

private void Step2_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    foreach (string file in GetFiles(PathClient))
    {
        string flist = "";
        if (file.Contains(PathClient + "\\"))
            flist = file.Replace(PathClient + "\\", "");
        else
             flist = file.Replace(PathClient, "");

         LB_FULL.Items.Add(flist);
    }
.
.
.

static IEnumerable<string> GetFiles(string path)
{
    Queue<string> queue = new Queue<string>();
    queue.Enqueue(path);
    while (queue.Count > 0)
    {
        path = queue.Dequeue();
        try
        {
            foreach (string subDir in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
                queue.Enqueue(subDir);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //ex
        }
        string[] files = null;
        try
        {
            files = Directory.GetFiles(path);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //ex
        }
        if (files != null)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < files.Length; i++)
            {
                yield return files[i];
            }
        }
    }
}

i've tried with OrderBy, but it only sorts by filename, regardless of the subfolder.

i want to sort it by subfolder first, then by filename.

for ex.

/
/file_a.bla
/file_b.bla
/file_c.bla
/sub1/file_a.bla
/sub1/file_b.bla
/sub2/_file_x.bla
/testsub/a.bla
...

and so on.

any ideas how to manage it?

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1 Answer

Is it a requirement to do your own recursive search or can you use the appropriate overload of Directory.GetFiles?

Anyway, using that overload, you can sort the files as I think you want (you didn't mention how you want sub-subdirectories ordered):

string dirToSearch = @"C:\temp";
string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(dirToSearch, "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
var mySortedFiles = files.OrderBy(r => Path.GetDirectoryName(r)).
    ThenBy(p => p.Count(c => c == Path.PathSeparator)).
    ThenBy(s => Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(s)).
    Select(t => t.Replace(dirToSearch, ""));

foreach (string s in mySortedFiles)
    Console.WriteLine(s);

Console.ReadLine();

Which gives, for example:

\CrossJoinA-H.sql
\ip-to-country.csv
\Kalimba.mp3
\LoadAssembly.sql
\ProcToUseAssembly.sql
\test.txt
\a\New Bitmap Image.bmp
\a\New Text Document.txt
\a\c\New Text Document.txt
\b\New Text Document.txt
\b\New Text Document (2).txt
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, that helped a lot. but if i am list a drive directly (for ex. N:) it shows the drive letter, which should not be displayed. otherwise it works as it should –  Thyrador Jun 24 '12 at 19:52
    
You mean if you set string dirToSearch = @"H:"; then it still shows the H:? –  Andrew Morton Jun 24 '12 at 20:01
    
yep. another thing is, that the code (mine too) doesnt deal with paths length larger than 260 characters, right? –  Thyrador Jun 24 '12 at 20:29
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