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to be precise, I'm trying to copy from file A to file B, every word that DOES NOT have both letters 'e' and 't' in them (the, peter, etc), the program works fine, but at the end of the outfile I'm getting a weird sign.

Input: What says Lucentio to this shame of ours?
Output: What says  to this shame of ours?˙

(Can u see the character ˙?)

I dont want it, I have no idea whats that, but its not EOF, i tried to declude it from copying and it does not work. I require some help here.

Code:

char signHold[1];

int main(int *argc, char** argv)
{
    FILE* infile;
    FILE* outfile;

    char* string = NULL;
    if(argc != 3)
    {
        printf(stderr,"Error: Improper number of arguments");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    remove(argv[2]);
    infile = fopen(argv[1],"r");
    while(feof(infile) == 0)
    {
        string = getWord(infile);
        if(checkDenied(string))
        addToFile(outfile, argv[2], string);

        addToFile(outfile, argv[2], signHold);
    }
    fclose(infile);
    free(string);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

char* getWord(FILE* ptr)
{
    char* tempString;
    size_t memSize = 0;
    int c;

    tempString = expandRealloc(NULL,sizeof(char));
    while(c = fgetc(ptr))
    {
        if(isalpha(c) != 0)
        {
            tempString = expandRealloc(tempString, (memSize+1)*sizeof(char)+1);
            tempString[memSize] = c;
            memSize++;
        }
        else
        {
            signHold[0] = c;
            break;
        }
    }
    tempString[memSize] = '\0';
    return tempString;
}

short int checkDenied(const char* str)
{
    int i;

    i = strspn("e", str);

    if(i >= 1)
    {
        i = strspn("t", str);
        if(i >= 1)
        {
            return EXIT_SUCCESS;
        }
    }
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

short int addToFile(FILE* ptr, char* directory, char* text)
{
    ptr = fopen(directory,"a+");
    fprintf(ptr,"%s", text);
    fclose(ptr);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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Why? This is going to be heavily I/O bound, so using C gains nothing over, say, AWK, in which it's trivial. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 15:47
2  
I'm a Computer Science student, and I'm trying to learn C.. What AWK has to do with this? ~.~ –  Piotr Jerzy Mamenas Jun 24 '12 at 15:49
    
Was it assigned as homework, or just your own idea of something to do? If it's homework, it should probably be tagged as such. Otherwise, I'd advise picking something else that's at least reasonably suited to the things C does well. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 15:52
1  
Your while( !feof(fp)) usage is terribly wrong. Much easyer is to just read a character using fgetc(), and comparing every returned int-value with EOF. –  wildplasser Jun 24 '12 at 15:56
1  
Another side note: instead of reopening the file for every word, try opening it once in the beginning and close it before quitting. Your way runs many many expensive and useless operations. –  Visa is Racism Jun 24 '12 at 16:00
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3 Answers

First off, you are assuming fgetc returns 0 on end of file, but that is not true. It returns EOF. Perhaps you are reading the EOF, assigning it to a character, that is signHold[0] (which could result in anything since EOF doesn't fit in char)

You then proceed to print signHold which contains a random character followed by who knows what since the string is not NUL-terminated (its size is 1 and its first character isn't '\0'. That is, you are printing anything that could happen to be after signHold. (This is also undefined behavior by the way).

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Could u point me the line where I assume fgetc returns 0? Also termination of the signhold[0] is not the issue, if i do: if(signHold[0] == '˙') and declude it like that, the char does not appear, which shows that the char is not signHold[495964] but signHold[0]. –  Piotr Jerzy Mamenas Jun 24 '12 at 16:11
    
while(c = fgetc(ptr)) –  wildplasser Jun 24 '12 at 16:13
    
I dont assume anything in this line, I'm just taking the character using fgetc, and eof is being checked in main using feof() >.> –  Piotr Jerzy Mamenas Jun 24 '12 at 16:21
    
@PiotrJerzyMamenas, you have put it in a while loop. This means your loop will stop when c = fgetc(ptr) is zero. When reading EOF, it is not zero. Therefore you go in the loop, and check if isalpha(c) is true, which is not. You then store it in signhold[0] and break. Also, ˙ is not an ASCII character. This means that whatever that got in c from EOF is being interpreted as that character. Since what you do is undefined behavior, anything could happen. Conversion of EOF to char could be different from '˙'. –  Visa is Racism Jun 24 '12 at 16:36
    
else { signHold[0] = c; break; } –  Piotr Jerzy Mamenas Jun 24 '12 at 16:42
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This is the statemachine. Making it use a variable sized buffer is left an exercise to the reader ;-)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    FILE *infile;
    FILE *outfile;

    char buff[100];
    size_t len,idx;
    int ch, state;

    if(argc != 3)
    {
        fprintf(stderr,"Error: Improper number of arguments");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    infile = fopen(argv[1],"r");
    outfile = fopen(argv[2],"w");

    len = 0;
    for (state=0; state >= 0; ) {
        ch = fgetc(infile);
        if (isalpha(ch)) {
            if (ch == 'e') state |= 1;
            else if (ch == 't') state |= 2;
            if (state != 3) buff[len++] = ch;
            continue;
        }
    /* no character, this must be the end of a word. */
        if (state != 3) for(idx=0; idx < len; idx++ ) {
            fputc(buff[idx], outfile);
            }
        if (ch == EOF) {state = -1; continue;}
        fputc(ch, outfile);
        len = 0; state = 0;
        }
    fclose(infile);
    fclose(outfile);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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I believe it is junk memory stored at signHold[1]. You only allow 1 character and do not NUL terminate it. This means when you write out the question mark it also writes out any memory after it that is before the first '\0'.

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