Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have something like this:

class BaseArg { }
class DerivedArg : BaseArg { }

interface IDoSomething
{
    void DoSomething();
}

class A : IDoSomething
{
    public BaseArg Value { get; set; }

    public A(BaseArg value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }

    public static A Create(BaseArg arg)
    {
        return new A(arg);
    }

    public static B Create(DerivedArg arg)
    {
        return new B(arg);
    }

    public virtual void DoSomething()
    {

    }
}

class B : A
{
    public DerivedArg DerivedValue { get; set; }

    public B(DerivedArg value)
        : base(value)
    {
        this.DerivedValue = value;
    }

    public override void DoSomething()
    {
        // does something different from A.DoSomething()
        // uses additional stuff in DerivedArg
    }
}

However, even when I do this:

DerivedArg arg = new DerivedArg();
A a = A.Create(arg);

A.Create(BaseArg arg) is called (and thus A is created, which was not the intention).

Am I missing something here? If so, how should I rewrite this without using weird stuff such as conditions on arg as DerivedArg.

share|improve this question
2  
Unable to reproduce. With the code you've given (fixed to make A.DoSomething virtual), the code you've given at the bottom does call A.Create(DerivedArg). Please show a short but complete program which actually demonstrates what you're claiming. –  Jon Skeet Jun 24 '12 at 16:31

1 Answer 1

The correct factory method is getting executed. Set a breakpoint inside of:

    public static B Create(DerivedArg arg)
    {
        return new B(arg); /* set breakpoint */
    }

It appears to you that it isn't being executed since you've defined the local variable of type A:

A a = A.Create(arg);

public static B Create(DerivedArg arg) is being called properly and an instance of type B is being returned and boxed as type A.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I stepped into it and A.Create(BaseArg arg) is called. –  mnn Jun 24 '12 at 17:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.