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I don't understand how SqlCommandBuilder does its thing. I have the following code:

public void TestCommandBuilder()
{
    var pubsDataSet = new DataSet("Pubs");
    var pubs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["PubsConnectionString"];
    var connection = new SqlConnection(pubs.ConnectionString);
    SqlCommand cmd = connection.CreateCommand();
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
    cmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM Publishers";
    var da = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);

    da.Fill(pubsDataSet, "publishers");
    foreach (DataRow row in pubsDataSet.Tables["publishers"].Rows)
    {
        row["pub_name"] = "Updated " + DateTime.Now.Minute + DateTime.Now.Second;
    }

    // The variable builder is not used
    var builder = new SqlCommandBuilder(da);

    da.UpdateBatchSize = 3;
    da.RowUpdated += DaRowUpdated;

    da.Update(pubsDataSet, "publishers");
}

private void DaRowUpdated(object sender, SqlRowUpdatedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Rows: " + e.RecordsAffected + "\r\n");
}

The variable builder is not used anywhere and I do not call the GetUpdateCommand() method, like they do on MSDN. I only create the SqlCommandBuilder, passing it a SqlDataAdapter. But the code just works fine.

If you look at the code, it seems like the line

var builder = new SqlCommandBuilder(da);

can be safely deleted. In fact, ReSharper is suggesting to remove it. But if I do, the code doesn't run anymore, as the SqlDataAdapter doesn't know how to perform an update.

In debug mode I noticed that after executing that line, the SqlDataAdapter's UpdateCommand property is still null. From the MSDN-docs I get that the SqlCommandBuilder registers itself to the RowUpdated event of the SqlDataAdapter.

But what does it do when that event is triggered? Is the SqlDataBuilder actually performing the update itself?

Something else I noticed, if I remove the SqlCommandBuilder, my DaRowUpdated method is triggered once, just before the InvalidOperationException occurs on the da.Update statement. I did not expect that. I'd think the RowUpdated event only occurs when a row has actually been updated.

So... three concrete questions:

  1. How can I prevent ReSharper from suggesting to delete this line?
  2. Is it bad practice to program a class like SqlCommandBuilder, where the code doesn't indicate in any way that creating an instance is doing something with the SqlDataAdapter passed in?
  3. Is this a design pattern?
share|improve this question
1  
Uninstall resharper? That did wonders for me. –  Will Jun 24 '12 at 19:09
    
You have a number of objects which implement IDisposable. Wrap these in using blocks to make sure the resources get released deterministically. I'll pop an answer below on how it should look. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 25 '12 at 2:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per my comment on the question:

    public void TestCommandBuilder()
    {
        var pubs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["PubsConnectionString"];

        using (var pubsDataSet = new DataSet("Pubs"))
        using (var connection = new SqlConnection(pubs.ConnectionString))
        using (SqlCommand cmd = connection.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            cmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM Publishers";

            using (var da = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
            using (new SqlCommandBuilder(da))
            {
                da.UpdateBatchSize = 3;
                da.RowUpdated += DaRowUpdated;
                da.Fill(pubsDataSet, "publishers");
                foreach (DataRow row in pubsDataSet.Tables["publishers"].Rows)
                {
                    row["pub_name"] = "Updated " + DateTime.Now.Minute + DateTime.Now.Second;
                }

                da.Update(pubsDataSet, "publishers");
            }
        }
    }

    private void DaRowUpdated(object sender, SqlRowUpdatedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Rows: " + e.RecordsAffected);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I think you may have to move the build before the updating of the rows since you are hooking into the event DataRowUpdated. –  Geek Jun 25 '12 at 2:14
    
Isn't da.Update(pubsDataSet, "publishers"); doing the updating, which is happening after the event is hooked? –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 25 '12 at 2:20
    
The update to the database is performed after correct. However I think the wiring up of the event (RowUpdated) needs to be done prior to the data changing. If you look at the MSDN example in the link you will see it is wired up immediately after the data adapter is initialized. –  Geek Jun 25 '12 at 12:31
    
try this edit on for size. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 25 '12 at 13:35
1  
@JesseC.Slicer: I've tried using ILSpy but I don't know what I should look for in order to check if Dispose is being called. However, I've just created my own class implementing IDisposable and added a destructor to it. Even if I don't use a variable, I see Dispose being called before the destructor is executed. So yes, a using statement still calls Dispose if you don't assign the instance to a variable. If you remove the var builder = from your answer I'll accept it. –  comecme Jun 30 '12 at 9:08
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If you are not consuming the variable, it is definitely not necessary. If something is going on in its constructor that is useful, you can still invoke that:

var builder = new SqlCommandBuilder(da);

Should be:

new SqlCommandBuilder(da);

This should take care of the warning without changing the behavior of the code. It looks a little weird, and if this is really necessary, I question the design of SqlCommandBuilder a bit. But in practice, a usage like this is essentially the same as an ordinary method invocation.

share|improve this answer
1  
Maybe I should keep a reference after all, so I can dispose it in the end. –  comecme Jun 24 '12 at 20:20
    
@comecme, good catch. Since it does implement IDisposable, you should wrap it in a using block. –  Kirk Woll Jun 24 '12 at 20:46
    
Wrapping it in a using statement doesn't make the warning go away, as builder still isn't used anywhere else. However, I can combine your answer with using using by writing using (new SqlCommandBuilder(da)). I didn't know that was possible inside using but it is. –  comecme Jun 25 '12 at 21:22
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My understanding that is during the construction of the command builder object it adds a reference to itself on the DataAdapter so it knows how to build CRUD commands.

Note this section under the remarks of the link you posted above.

*

The SqlDataAdapter does not automatically generate the Transact-SQL statements required to reconcile changes made to a DataSet with the associated instance of SQL Server. However, you can create a SqlCommandBuilder object to automatically generate Transact-SQL statements for single-table updates if you set the SelectCommand property of the SqlDataAdapter. Then, any additional Transact-SQL statements that you do not set are generated by the SqlCommandBuilder.

*

share|improve this answer
    
For resharper - you will just have to live with it as you can't exclude items like this at a granular level. However I do agree it should be used inside a using statement. –  Geek Jun 25 '12 at 1:21
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