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How can I make this code work?

#!/bin/bash
ARRAYNAME='FRUITS'
FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE )
for FRUIT in ${!ARRAYNAME[@]}
do
    echo ${FRUIT}
done

This code:

echo ${!ARRAYNAME[0]}

Prints APPLE. I'm tryng to do something similar but with "[@]" to iterate over the array.

Thanks in advance,

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4  
Please see BashFAQ/006. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 24 '12 at 20:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

${!ARRAYNAME[@]} means "the indices of ARRAYNAME". As stated in the bash man page since ARRAYNAME is set, but as a string, not an array, it returns 0.

Here's a solution using eval.

#!/usr/bin/env bash

ARRAYNAME='FRUITS'
FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE )

eval array=\( \${${ARRAYNAME}[@]} \)

for fruit in "${array[@]}"; do
  echo ${fruit}
done

What you were originally trying to do was create an Indirect Reference. These were introduced in bash version 2 and were meant to largely replace the need for eval when trying to achieve reflection-like behavior in the shell.

What you have to do when using indirect references with arrays is include the [@] in your guess at the variable name:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

ARRAYNAME='FRUITS'
FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE )

array="${ARRAYNAME}[@]"
for fruit in "${!array}"; do
  echo $fruit
done

All that said, it's one thing to use Indirect References in this trivial example, but, as indicated in the link provided by Dennis Williamson, you should be hesitant to use them in real-world scripts. They are all but guaranteed to make your code more confusing than necessary. Usually you can get the functionality you need with an Associative Array.

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Tim: your 2nd part of the answer is not useful, because ARRAYNAME is an input parameter of my script. But your first solution let me find a more elegant solution: ARRAY=${!ARRAYNAME}; for FRUIT in ${ARRAY[@]}... Thanks –  Neuquino Jun 24 '12 at 20:38
    
@Neuquino See my edited answer. All you need to do is concatenate [@] on the end of your input variable. –  Tim Pote Jun 24 '12 at 20:42
2  
@Neuquino If ARRAYNAME is an input parameter to your script then you're doing something terribly wrong. There are zero reasons to mix user input with variable names. In this case (combined with indirect expansion), it allows arbitrary code injection. The ONLY valid reason for these techniques are for use in functions, never in the global scope and never combined with user input. –  ormaaj Jul 4 '12 at 11:30
    
@ormaaj ARRAYNAME is not an input parameter. I have a config file (config.conf) with KEYS=( FRUITS VEGETABLES MEAT ), and then multiple lines with FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE )\n VEGETABLES=( BEANS LETTUCE )\n MEAT=( CHICKEN ROAST_BEAF ). Then in my script I do source config.conf. –  Neuquino Jul 19 '12 at 15:37
    
@Neuquino Should be ok if you can trust the input (file in this case). –  ormaaj Jul 19 '12 at 17:21

Here's a way to do it without eval.

See Bash trick #2 described here: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/006

Seems to work in bash 3 and up.

#!/bin/bash

ARRAYNAME='FRUITS'
tmp=$ARRAYNAME[@]
FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE "STAR FRUIT" )
for FRUIT in "${!tmp}"
do
    echo "${FRUIT}"
done

Here's a more realistic example showing how to pass an array by reference to a function:

pretty_print_array () {
  local arrayname=$1
  local tmp=$arrayname[@]
  local array=( "${!tmp}" )
  local FS=', ' # Field seperator
  local var
  # Print each element enclosed in quotes and separated by $FS
  printf -v var "\"%s\"$FS" "${array[@]}"
  # Chop trailing $FS
  var=${var%$FS}
  echo "$arrayname=($var)"
}
FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE "STAR FRUIT" )
pretty_print_array FRUITS
# prints FRUITS=("APPLE", "BANANA", "ORANGE", "STAR FRUIT")
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I just wanted to add another useful use-case. I was searching the web for a solution to a different, but related problem

ARRAYNAME=( FRUITS VEG )
FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE )
VEG=( CARROT CELERY CUCUMBER )
for I in "${ARRAYNAME[@]}"
do
    array="${I}[@]"
    for fruit in "${!array}"; do
        echo $fruit
    done
done
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1  
This does not really answer the question. If you have a different question, you can ask it by clicking Ask Question. You can also add a bounty to draw more attention to this question. –  Eternal1 Aug 28 '14 at 7:21

Despite the simple OP question, these answers won't scale for the most common, real use-cases, i.e., array elements containing whitespace or wildcards that should not yet be expanded to filenames.

FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE 'not broken' '*.h')
ARRAYNAME=FRUITS
eval ARRAY=\(\${$ARRAYNAME[@]}\)

$ echo "${ARRAY[4]}"
broken
$ echo "${ARRAY[5]}"
config.h
$

This works:

FRUITS=( APPLE BANANA ORANGE 'not broken' '*.h')
ARRAYNAME=FRUITS
eval ARRAY="(\"\${$ARRAYNAME[@]}\")"

$ echo "${ARRAY[3]}"
not broken
$ echo "${ARRAY[4]}"
*.h
$

Just as you should get in the habit of using "$@" not $@, always quote inside ( ) for array expansions, unless you want filename expansion or know there's no possibility of array elements containing whitespace.

Do this: X=("${Y[@]}")

Not this: X=(${Y[@]})

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