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I am so confused why the cout statement is not printing the contents of the array c_braces_array in the function find_depth;

All I am trying to do is pass an array and print its values.

#include <iostream>

int find_depth(char c_braces_array[], int no_of_braces)
{
    for(int i=0; i<no_of_braces; i++)
    {
        std::cout<<"val is:"<<c_braces_array[i]<<"F\n";
    }
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    char braces[100] = {0};
    int ret_val = find_depth(braces, 100);
    std::cout<<ret_val;
    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}

O/P:

...
val is: F
val is: F
val is: F
val is: F
val is: F
0Press any key to continue . . .

enter image description here

Edit: I initialized the array to contain all 0s in the main. So I was expecting 0s to be printed. I am not sure where the O (as in Oh!) thing comes into context. Can someone explain a bit more on that?

I was expecting this o/p

val is:0 F

Edit - 2: Guys thanks. Thanks for pointing out the bug. Also I do not understand why the following line initializes only braces[0] with 'a' instead of the entire array. WHat is the correct way to init the entire array instead of running a for loop.

Now my code looks as below.

main(){
        ...
    char a_char = 'a';
    char braces[100] = {a_char};
      }

find_depth(..)
{
     ...
    std::cout<<"val is:"<<c_braces_array_ptr[i]<<"X\n";
}

O/P
Inside main: a
val is:aX
val is: X
val is: X
val is: X
val is: X
val is: X
val is: X
val is: X

share|improve this question
2  
A character 0 is a null terminator, used to end strings, as opposed to '0', which has the ASCII value 48. You also shouldn't use system("pause"), as you have no guarantees what the pause program on someone else's computer will do. –  chris Jun 24 '12 at 20:23
    
It is, but your array is empty. –  Ryan Jun 24 '12 at 20:23
    
Since you've initialized your braces array to all 0's, it's printing no_of_braces empty strings. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 24 '12 at 20:26
3  
Out of curiosity, what's the output you're expecting? –  Luchian Grigore Jun 24 '12 at 20:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems most of your questions were answered, but for the sake of completeness, let's review.

  1. The reason why nothing is printing where you expect is because you've initialized the array to contain all 0 values. A 0 is a null-terminator for c-strings, meaning it marks the end of a string. It is a non-printing character as well, we don't want to end every c-string with a printing-character, that wouldn't make sense. If you want the ASCII character 0, you would need '0' which is decimal 48. (See: http://www.asciitable.com/)
  2. When declaring and initializing an array with data, it will fill each element with the corresponding data in your initialization list. In example; char myArray[10] = {'a', 'b', 'c'}; would initialize the array with the values myArray[0] = 'a'; myArray[1] = 'b'; myArray[2] = 'c'; but what about all of the other elements? It doesn't assume you want one element repeated, and it also assumes you don't want garbage. Instead it fills the array up with 0 values.
  3. I assume your next question might be along the lines of "How can I fill it with a different value?" There is no way to change how the array is initialized without explicitly stating each and every value for each and every element. But - you can set each value.

    unsigned int i;
    char myArray[100]; // Don't waste time initializing any data yet.
    
    for(i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
    {
         myArray[i] = 'a'; // Set each element to 'a' - Now it's initialized!
    }
    

    Another option is to use memset();, which is a part of <string.h>. This will set each element to a given value, and for your case is probably what you need. This is done like so:

    #include <string.h>
    
    char myArray[100]; // Declare, don't initialize.
    memset(myArray, 'a', 100); // Initialize by setting each value to 'a'!
    

Hope this helped! It may be useful to just practice and play around with c-strings to understand them a bit better. Just a note, there is a difference between '0' and 0, 0 is just the value of zero, whereas '0' is the character value for the zero character. (Read: 48). So if you want to memset to print 0, you have to memset(myArray, '0', 100);

share|improve this answer

Try:

std::cout<<"val is:"<< (int)(c_braces_array[i]) <<"F\n";
share|improve this answer
3  
You misspelt static_cast. Also, seeing as how the OP wishes to print the contents of the array, it would be better to change the array to hold the right values instead of casting each one for output. –  chris Jun 24 '12 at 20:29
2  
lol. who is miss pelt? –  Rafael Baptista Jun 24 '12 at 20:34
    
Dang you beat me to it. I'd also add that if the goal is to print the VALUE (not the char) at each index of the array, casting to an int is indeed what you should do (as Rafael shows), whether you use static_cast<int>(c_braces_array[i]) or the C-style cast as Rafael shows. However, if your goal is to print the ASCII characters in the array, then chris is right that you ought to actually write some ASCII characters into the array rather than just make it all zeros. –  phonetagger Jun 24 '12 at 20:35
    
The static_cast is better, as it is both explicit and doesn't cause the problems that C-style casts can. From the OP's post: why the cout statement is not printing the contents of the array. This leads me to believe that the contents would be better '0' than 0. –  chris Jun 24 '12 at 20:37
    
Just because a feature exists and makes the code ever-so-slightly safer, doesn't mean it should be used if it is hideous, which static_cast is. –  Benjamin Lindley Jun 24 '12 at 20:52

It is trying to print your variable value. That value is 0, which is not '0'. 0 is not a printable character, so nothing can be printed.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is 0 not a printable character? –  ZERO Jun 24 '12 at 22:30

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