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so... Is this a safe way to use internal links on your site.. By doing this i have the index page generating the usual php content section and handing it to the div element.

THE MAIN QUESTION: Will google still index the pages using this method? Common sense tells me it does.. But just double checking and leaving this here as a base example as well if it is. As in.

EXAMPLE ONLY PEOPLE


The Server Side

if (isset($_REQUEST['page'])) {$pageID=$_REQUEST['page'];} else {$pageID="home";}
if (isset($_REQUEST['pageMode']) && $_REQUEST['pageMode']=="js") {
  require "content/".$pageID.".php";
  exit;
} // ELSE - REST OF WEBSITE WILL BE GENERATED USING THE page VARIABLE

The Links

<a class='btnMenu' href='?page=home'>Home Page</a>
<a class='btnMenu' href='?page=about'>About</a>
<a class='btnMenu' href='?page=Services'>Services</a>
<a class='btnMenu' href='?page=contact'>Contact</a>

The Javascript

$(function() {
    $(".btnMenu").click(function(){return doNav(this);});
});

function doNav(objCaller) {
  var sPage = $(objCaller).attr("href").substring(6,255);
  $.get("index.php", { page: sPage, pageMode: 'js'}, function(data) {
    ("#siteContent").html(data).scrollTop(0);
  });
  return false;
}

Forgive me if there are any errors, as just copied and pasted from my script then removed a bunch of junk to simplify it as still prototyping/white boarding the project its in. So yes it does look a little nasty at the moment.

REASONS WHY: The main reason is bandwidth and speed, This will allow other scripts to run and control the site/application a little better and yes it will need to be locked down with some coding. --

FURTHER EXAMPLE-- INSERT PHP AT TOP

<?php 
  // PHP CODE HERE
?>
<html>
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css" />
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="scripts.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
  <div class='siteBody'>
    <div class='siteHeader'>
        <?php
          foreach ($pageList as $key => $value) {
            if ($pageID == $key) {$btnClass="btnMenuSel";} else {$btnClass="btnMenu";}
              echo "<a class='$btnClass' href='?page=".$key."'>".$pageList[$key]."</a>";
          }
        ?>
      </div><div id="siteContent"  style='margin-top:10px;'>
        <?php require "content/".$pageID.".php"; ?>
      </div><div class='siteFooter'>
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
1  
Side note...don't use _REQUEST. You should know what method your users are requesting. Allowing them to be interchangeable is a bad idea. –  Galen Jun 24 '12 at 20:49
    
Just make yourself clear. –  The Alpha Jun 24 '12 at 20:55
2  
I hate this. It's horrible from a HCI perspective if you don't put a lot of effort into it to get the browser behave in excatly the same way as on regular page loads (spinner, stop button, back button, address bar, "bookmarkability", caching and so on). Most websites playing with Ajax content loading fails on this in one way or another, making it hard to know if you correctly clicked a link or leaving the user on some undefined place when pushing the back button. –  Emil Vikström Jun 24 '12 at 20:55
    
REQUEST - i know, like i said... whitebaording the idea at the moment.. Not tested yet.. as for the browser compatibility with buttons i do agree.. There are still other things that are considered here but not put in.. Please understand this is just a base example/question for the SEO side of things. –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 21:10
    
2+ years later and this came in handy for a quick copy n paste. –  Mayhem Sep 14 '14 at 7:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, this is not search engine friendly. You're using JavaScript to get content from the server and display it on the page. Although search engines are getting better with handling JavaScript generated content they still can't handle this (unless you follow Google's crawlable Ajax standard but sites have been moving away from that most notably Twitter this past month).

So this is bad for SEO. Plus you're not saving as much bandwidth as you think. The savings are minimal and with bandwidth being so cheap this is completely unnecessary. In fact, you spent more money making your site inaccessible by taking a normal action (page load) and made it convoluted by using JavaScript to do it then you would have saved in bandwidth costs.

Yes, this is search engine friendly and a good example of progressive enhancement. Because the links are still crawlable and load the same content as with JavaScript so Google, and any user without JavaScript enabled, can still find the content just fine. Your users with JavaScript will get the added benefit of a faster page load since they don't need to wait for the whole page to load when they click the link.

share|improve this answer
    
The site itself still uses the default content, for example ?page=about will by default show the about page.. Headers/footers and so on adjust with the page variable –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 20:49
    
If the links work stand-alone without javascript, what's not "SEO safe" about them? –  Esailija Jun 24 '12 at 20:49
    
hence the exit; comment, rest of site is below.. that is purely a header script –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 20:49
    
I was just wanting to comfirm that google does not mess around or anything when it comes to this type of handling of anchors –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 20:50
    
Okay, have updated and will clean it abit for.. basic example using a menu class changer as well –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 20:57

It is unclear what the SEO impact is. Google now interprets some javascript. So it is possible - but not guaranteed - that Google can still read these links. Usually people want to hide the links to pages like "About". So if Google can't read these links you may actually get an SEO advantage. That is more pagerank gets concentrated on pages you care about. Some big sites actually generate links to such pages using javascript for this reason.

Once live you can check if Google found the links by looking at links to the about us page in Webmaster tools.

share|improve this answer

i think the anchors are okay, but you should improve the server-side script as it outputs just the main content, not the whole page.

by checking $_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH'] you can distinguish between an ajax-call and a "normal" request. this is a header set automatically by jquery.

if an ajax-call is made, output the main content, otherwise output everything: the doctype, the html-tags and all the fun stuff that's between them. so everybody gets the content, even crawler and other visitors without javascript.

further info: http://davidwalsh.name/detect-ajax

example:

<?php
    $pageID = isset($_POST['page'])
        ? $_POST['page']
        : "home";

    if ( !$_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH'] ) {
        require('content/components/header.php');
    }

    require "content/" . $pageID . ".php";

    if ( !$_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH'] ) {
        require('content/components/footer.php');
    }

?>

with content/components/header.php:

<html>
    <head>
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css" />
        <script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class='siteBody'>
            <div class='siteHeader'>
                <?php
                    foreach ($pageList as $key => $value) {
                        if ($pageID == $key) {$btnClass="btnMenuSel";} else {$btnClass="btnMenu";}
                        echo "<a class='$btnClass' href='?page=".$key."'>".$pageList[$key]."</a>";
                    }
                ?>
            </div>
        <div id="siteContent"  style='margin-top:10px;'>

and content/components/footer.php:

        </div>
    <div class='siteFooter'></div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
I realise the headers can be checked, just trying to show a general example and confirm my thoughts about it. The php is a simple if then grab early content and exit else continue building the main page and content –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 21:08
    
Side note: the pageMode is handled in other ways as well –  Mayhem Jun 24 '12 at 23:23

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